Criminal Defense Attorney in Summerville, SC

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Fighting For You

When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients’ cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring – a criminal defense attorney on Summerville, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

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Richard Waring

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in Summerville

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry’s history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of Summerville’s legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in Summerville, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system’s ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in Summerville:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense
Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In Summerville, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In Summerville, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney’s role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime – a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Summerville, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Summerville, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Knowing Your Rights
Knowing Your Rights

Criminal Case Timeline In Summerville, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in Summerville, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone – most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of Summerville’s criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Arrest And Investigation

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Initial Bond Setting

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in Summerville, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Preliminary Hearing

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Initial Appearance

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Plea Offers

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant’s acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Discovery

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in Summerville, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Indictment

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a “count.” During this phase, the State will gather a “grand jury” comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant’s case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor’s job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client’s innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution’s case.

Typically, a trial in Summerville includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State’s Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense’s Case
  • The State’s Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in Summerville

Summerville resident recounts Christmas spent in Italy with American GI during WWII

SUMMERVILLE — It’s hard for 84-year-old Rina Palmer to get people to believe that she lived through World War II in Italy.And while it was one of the most difficult times in her life, there were bright spots.One of them, an early childhood Christmas memory from the end of the war when she was about 8 years old, reassures her family that she was fated to be with her late husband, Jack Franklin Palmer Jr.It was when she met her first American friend, a GI stationed there in Italy.“I still get goose...

SUMMERVILLE — It’s hard for 84-year-old Rina Palmer to get people to believe that she lived through World War II in Italy.

And while it was one of the most difficult times in her life, there were bright spots.

One of them, an early childhood Christmas memory from the end of the war when she was about 8 years old, reassures her family that she was fated to be with her late husband, Jack Franklin Palmer Jr.

It was when she met her first American friend, a GI stationed there in Italy.

“I still get goosebumps,” Palmer said.

Over the past month, Palmer has been moving around old items in her Summerville family home of more than 50 years.

While shuffling through old memories, she came across a letter in which her husband had helped her write down some of her early recollections of Christmas. In it, she depicts a Christmas she spent in an orphanage in Udine, Italy, toward the end of the war.

“I keep everything,” Palmer said.

She wasn’t actually an orphan at the time. Her mother was unable to watch her, so she was one of the few children there who wasn’t adoptable during the war.

That Christmas, a group of American GIs came and organized a Christmas party for the children. Each child was assigned to a GI.

Palmer doesn’t remember her GI’s name, only that he was tall, slim and very nice. She never knew her father, and in that moment, the GI felt like one to her, she said.

That party was the first time she had ever had chocolate candy and hot chocolate — a food item she is still crazy about.

“We have to keep her out of chocolate,” said Rina’s daughter, Barbara Palmer.

In the letter, Rina talks about a large room filled with Christmas decorations and tables with food. She makes special note of the bright shining star on the Christmas tree and how she would never forget it.

Though they didn’t speak a common language, Palmer’s American friend would go on to show her pictures of his family and attempt to tell her as best as he could about them and how he missed them.

The letter closes with, “Thank you American friend, wherever you may be, thank you.”

The children at the orphanage would go on to talk about the party for weeks.

“It was so nice,” Rina said.

An unexpected connection

It wouldn’t be the last time she would see the soldier.

Palmer would go on to meet her husband some years later in Italy. He was a serviceman with the Air Force stationed in the country.

They were married in 1955. Rina was 18 at the time. Looking through old wedding pictures, she remembers how nervous she was.

Jack couldn’t speak Italian and she couldn’t speak English. But somehow they made it work, she said.

They would go one to have two children and endless stories of her time in America.

She was told by Italian friends that when she got to America it would look like New York, and she would have a giant house with people making her breakfast.

Instead, after sailing from Europe, Jack would take her to his family in Athens, Tennessee. There wasn’t a bathroom in the house.

Eventually Rina learned English, and Jack built her the big home her friends told her she would get. Jack died 12 years ago after a battle with cancer.

“He was a good daddy,” Rina said.

Barbara kept the name Palmer after getting married to keep Jack’s legacy alive. She said she always remembers how wherever her father went, Rina was with him.

“He was a family man,” she said.

But one story still gives Rina goosebumps. They were visiting some of Jack’s family in Georgia.

When she walked into the home, Rina saw a familiar face in a photo of Jack’s uncle. As she got closer, she said, she realized that it was the American GI that gave her chocolate all those years ago.

At the time, she still couldn’t speak English, so she couldn’t tell everyone, but Rina said she will never forget the man’s face.

Neither Barbara nor her mother know the uncle’s name. But Barbara said it feels like his meeting her mother was the beginning of her parents’ love story.

“It’s kind of like fate,” Barbara said.

Four Berkeley County schools transitioning to virtual learning over staffing concerns

BERKELEY COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - The Berkeley County School District has announced that four of its schools will be transitioning to virtual learning for one week because of staffing concerns.The district said beginning Friday, students at Cane Bay High, College Park Middle, Goose Creek Elementary, and Goose Creek High will learn from home and return to the in-person school setting on Jan. 24.The temporary conversion to distance learning is due to staffing concerns and not student infection rate concerns, according to the distric...

BERKELEY COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - The Berkeley County School District has announced that four of its schools will be transitioning to virtual learning for one week because of staffing concerns.

The district said beginning Friday, students at Cane Bay High, College Park Middle, Goose Creek Elementary, and Goose Creek High will learn from home and return to the in-person school setting on Jan. 24.

The temporary conversion to distance learning is due to staffing concerns and not student infection rate concerns, according to the district.

As a result, athletic and extracurricular activities will proceed as normal, district officials said.

“The decision to convert Cane Bay High, College Park Middle, Goose Creek Elementary, and Goose Creek High to distance learning is based on operational concerns,” said Deon Jackson, BCSD Superintendent. “Staffing shortages have greatly necessitated this decision as school staffs continue to be impacted by COVID-19 isolations and quarantine protocol, and the substitute pool is limited when relied upon by 47 schools. We understand the burden this places on our students, staff and families as our shared goal is to provide quality instruction to our students in our buildings; however, we had to consider how the limited availability of staff impacts safety on campus and instruction. We look forward to the return of these students on Monday, January 24.”

The district released the following additional information:

Schools will work with staff and families to ensure that all students receive their Chromebooks. Information concerning access to assignments and livestream instruction schedules will be provided to students and/or parents by principals and teachers.

BCSD will continue to provide breakfast and lunch at no cost to students at these four schools during this temporary conversion to a distance learning platform. Meals will be distributed Monday through Friday by a drive-through pick up service.

Cane Bay High, College Park Middle, Goose Creek Elementary, and Goose Creek High students can pick-up breakfast and lunch (10 a.m. to 12 p.m.) from the following locations:

Students will not be permitted to enter the buildings or eat on-site. Child Nutrition will be using the “roster system” so the names of the students will need to be provided by the person(s) picking up the meals.

“We need the support and cooperation of our families and communities to ensure that staff and students return to school healthy and that our remaining schools stay open,” Jackson continued. “Our schools mirror their communities, so we ask that our families and communities follow SC DHEC guidelines, maintain physical distancing in group settings, practice good hygiene, limit unnecessary interactions and gatherings, and wear a mask when physical distancing cannot be achieved or is not practical.”

Cane Bay High, College Park Middle, Goose Creek Elementary, and Goose Creek High students will return to campuses from distance learning on Monday, January 24. All other BCSD schools will continue to operate in-person following their normal schedules.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Summerville 10-year-old featured in national magazine for saving family from fire

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCIV) — A 10-year-old Summerville hero! Aussie Talbott- who saved her entire family from a fire- is now receiving national recognition.Brave and courageous are a just a few of the words that come to mind when describing Aussie Talbott.Aussie is a Summerville girl who says she could have never imagined her life would change so quickly.“It is ...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCIV) — A 10-year-old Summerville hero! Aussie Talbott- who saved her entire family from a fire- is now receiving national recognition.

Brave and courageous are a just a few of the words that come to mind when describing Aussie Talbott.

Aussie is a Summerville girl who says she could have never imagined her life would change so quickly.

“It is one of those things that you see happening, you see it on the news or something, but you never think it would happen to you. It was terrible. I am just so thankful everyone was so kind and helpful," says Aussie.

Back in April, Aussie woke up at 4 a.m. to the sight of flames in her home. That’s when she sprinted into action. She woke her entire family up and got them to safety in time.

“In times like that it is okay to be scared, but you still have to be brave, and you have to be prepared for it," says Aussie.

Now Aussie is being featured in the January edition of Highlights Magazine, as an inspiration for how others can be strong, especially in the worst of situations.

“Some people do not have the courage for some things, but I feel like when there is a time like that, because I did not really have much courage, but during a time like that, all of my body gave me courage and bravery, it made me feel like I had to do something,” says Aussie.

Aussie tells us since the fire, life has only gotten better. She and her family have a new home and are back on their feet. Her family says they could not have done it without the help of Flowertown Elementary, Ashley Ridge High School, And Summerville Fire And Rescue.

“Everything has a silver lining, so it will come to you, with us, our silver lining is that we got everything, we are back on our feet now. there is always a silver lining to everything, so I am sure that it will come eventually,” says Aussie.

Aussie has also been recognized by the town of Summerville and the South Carolina State Senate.

“Small Town Christmas” films in Summerville

Summerville recently attracted national attention as film crews for the first-ever season of UPtv’s “Small Town Christmas” stopped by on their tour of small towns throughout the nation.Summerville was one of four towns that the crew explored, along with Branson, Mo., Bethlehem, Pa., and Natchitoches, La. Megan Alexander, who is the executive producer and host of the show, said the towns were selected from a list of places she was interested in visiting.“We needed to find four small towns that kicked thin...

Summerville recently attracted national attention as film crews for the first-ever season of UPtv’s “Small Town Christmas” stopped by on their tour of small towns throughout the nation.

Summerville was one of four towns that the crew explored, along with Branson, Mo., Bethlehem, Pa., and Natchitoches, La. Megan Alexander, who is the executive producer and host of the show, said the towns were selected from a list of places she was interested in visiting.

“We needed to find four small towns that kicked things off early in November to get things on air for TV,” Alexander said. “I made a list of small towns that I would love to try to visit and ultimately came down a lot to logistics and scheduling.”

Alexander, who is a mom to three children, said the idea was born from her family’s love of traveling during the holiday season as a way to experience what Christmas is like in different places. When COVID-19 hit, Alexander’s itch to start up the show and travel only continued to grow. This year, she set off to each selected small town to finally film and experience the holidays.

“I thought this would be a boost to local tourism and small businesses,” Alexander said. “The big cities tend to get all of the attention, but I thought, ‘Let’s bring the cameras to them, let’s show them what’s happening in our small towns.’ There’s so many wonderful people, and I knew there would be such an appetite for it.”

Christmas in Summerville

Alexander was joined by a crew of seven other team members, including Kevin McIntyre, who is the director of photography, Kassidy Sell, who is the field producer, and Matt Disbrow, Benji Robinson, Sean Conlon and Nick Smiga, who are members of the film crew.

Tina Zimmerman, who is tourism director for Summerville, said there was a group effort throughout town to help showcase Summerville while the film crew visited.

“Everyone in the town pulled together to make it happen,” Zimmerman said.

During her time in town, Alexander said she visited with local merchants and community members. She filmed segments of the show during the Old Time Summerville Christmas Celebration and the Summerville Christmas Parade.

From staying at the Linwood Inn, located off Palmetto Street, to sipping a peppermint mocha from Cuppa Manna downtown, Alexander said that she feels as though she got the full Summerville experience.

“I felt like I got to experience Southern hospitality by staying there,” Alexander said. “We got to experience the live windows displays and Christmas trees on Mistletoe Lane.”

This year, Zimmerman said, the town’s participation in local events, including the live window displays during the Old Time Summerville Christmas Celebration, was at an all-time high.

“It was a lot of work for them to do the live windows, especially this year with a shortage of staff and what they’ve been through,” Zimmerman said. “But we had record participation and adorable creative windows.”

Zimmerman thinks the publicity Summerville will get from being featured on the show will bring more tourists to the area.

“If we did the same thing we did this year next year, everyone will be glad they visited,” Zimmerman said.

The Summerville episode of the show will have its world broadcast premiere on Christmas Eve at 9 p.m. The show will be aired on UPtv on channel 124.

“I just felt like it was such a blessing and a privilege to tell those stories, to showcase these small towns and the faces behind these small towns,” Alexander said.

University Hospital Summerville partners with Augusta Tech to create health sciences campus

AUGUSTA, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) - University Hospital Summerville is currently home to physician practices like cardiology primary care and wound care, outpatient imaging as well as occupational medicine. And they’re excited to be adding nursing education there as well.The plan is to use these buildings as a health science campus for students. It’s all a part of a 5-year plan to bring more health care professionals into our community.Right now, Georgia has the fifth-lowest nurse-to-population ratio in the country and South...

AUGUSTA, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) - University Hospital Summerville is currently home to physician practices like cardiology primary care and wound care, outpatient imaging as well as occupational medicine. And they’re excited to be adding nursing education there as well.

The plan is to use these buildings as a health science campus for students. It’s all a part of a 5-year plan to bring more health care professionals into our community.

Right now, Georgia has the fifth-lowest nurse-to-population ratio in the country and South Carolina is last.

As pen hit paper, a new opportunity is coming for local students and hospitals in Augusta.

“It’s a tremendous move. We’re going to have so many more opportunities, so much more space, resources,” said Brendan Alee, occupational assistant student at Augusta Tech.

Augusta Tech is partnering with University Hospital, to transform the Summerville campus into a health sciences campus for students like Alee.

Phase one of this project will mean Augusta Tech moving their nursing and medical assistant programs to the professional building, where there will be classrooms. There will be three more phases after, but it will take some time.

“I think the size of our facilities there is going to be double or even triple what we have now,” he said.

The pandemic has created an urgent need for healthcare workers.

“This is a really bad problem heading our way, in fact, I already believe it’s here,” said James Davis, University Health Care System president, CEO.

After five years, this program should graduate 200 nurses, and double every year after.

“Today we would be happy to hire about 200 nurses at University Health Care System, today if they were available, but they simply aren’t available,” said Davis.

Augusta Tech says 94 percent of their grads end up staying in the CSRA.

“When we graduate any student, they make a living here, they raise a family, that’s an incredible attribute that we can provide for residents,” said Dr. Jermaine Whirl, Augusta Technical College president.

Being able to provide for the community, is something these students live to do.

Alee said: “It’s inspirational and it motivates me to want to learn and get out there and start doing all those things and helping people.”

Copyright 2022 WRDW/WAGT. All rights reserved.

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