Criminal Defense Attorney in Sullivan's Island, SC

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Fighting For You

When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients' cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring - a criminal defense attorney on Sullivan's Island, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

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Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

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Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in Sullivan's Island

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry's history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of Sullivan's Island's legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in Sullivan's Island, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system's ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in Sullivan's Island:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In Sullivan's Island, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney's role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime - a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Sullivan's Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Sullivan's Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

Criminal Case Timeline In Sullivan's Island, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in Sullivan's Island, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone - most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of Sullivan's Island's criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in Sullivan's Island, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant's acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in Sullivan's Island, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Criminal Defense Attorney Sullivan's Island, SC

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a "count." During this phase, the State will gather a "grand jury" comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant's case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor's job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client's innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution's case.

Typically, a trial in Sullivan's Island includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State's Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense's Case
  • The State's Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Charleston Is the Best Small City in the U.S.

Maybe it’s the cobblestone streets. Or the friendly locals. Or the incredible food, charming hotels, and endless water views. Whatever the reason, our readers continue to be utterly charmed by Charleston, South Carolina. In fact, it was just voted the best small city in the United States in our 2022 Readers’ Choice A...

Maybe it’s the cobblestone streets. Or the friendly locals. Or the incredible food, charming hotels, and endless water views. Whatever the reason, our readers continue to be utterly charmed by Charleston, South Carolina. In fact, it was just voted the best small city in the United States in our 2022 Readers’ Choice Awards.

Now in its 35th year, our annual Readers' Choice Awards continues to capture the travel experiences our readers love best, from hotels and airlines to cruises and islands. The numbers prove what we already knew: Enthusiasm for travel has never been higher, as demonstrated by the nearly quarter of a million of you who filled out this year’s survey. The best cities in the world (large and small) are a testament to the staying power of perennial favorites, through thick and thin—with some newcomers to consider.

Charleston is no stranger to accolades. Our readers named it the best small city for an incredible 10 consecutive years until it was edged out by Aspen in 2021—not surprising, with most travelers seeking out wide open spaces during the pandemic. But the Holy City took back its crown this year, and everything feels relatively normal once again.

While there are clearly many reasons to love this Southern city, you really can’t talk about the destination without immediately calling out its dining scene. “Excellent restaurants” and “delicious food” were mentioned in countless survey responses, with particular attention paid to seafood, sweet tea, and hearty breakfasts.

The city excels at Southern cuisine, of course, but don’t sleep on Charleston’s more diverse dining options. Be sure to try the escargot at Maison, the tender agnolotti and veal scallopini at Wild Olive, the gazpacho at Malagón Mercado y Tapería, and the fried smelt with garlic skordalia sauce at Stella’s. We wouldn’t dare tell you to skip the Southern classics, though: If you’re lucky enough to find an empty parking spot at The Glass Onion, break any mild traffic laws to get it. The shrimp po’boys, fried grouper cheeks, and lemon meringue pie are the stuff of legends.

Luckily for any calorie counters out there, Charleston also boasts an extremely walkable downtown area and a plethora of outdoor activities. You can hop onboard one of the famous horse-drawn carriages (“carriage rides both day and evening are a must,” writes one reader), or take a self-guided walking tour past Waterfront Park, the live oaks at White Point Gardens, Legare's gorgeous homes, and more.

There are many great beaches to choose from in the spring and summer, with “water as warm as a bath,” but we’re particular fans of the stretches of sand on Sullivan’s Island. These beaches are wide enough to fit the crowds, have gentle waves, and are surrounded by natural walking paths through lush vegetation. Get out on the water with a kayaking tour—one of Charleston’s trademark outdoor activities—and you might even spot a pair of surfacing dolphins or an elusive summer manatee.

After days spent exploring the water and sampling as much food as possible, retreat back to one of Charleston’s many excellent hotels and soak up that world-famous Southern hospitality. Our readers are big fans of both classic stays like French Quarter Inn and Wentworth Mansion, as well as newer openings like The Dewberry Charleston (“wonderful hotel with a beautiful view on rooftop bar”) and The Spectator Hotel.

Travelers have a major reason to visit Charleston in 2023, as well: In January, the city will open the highly anticipated International African American Museum (IAAM). The museum has been built upon a former slave trading port, and it will feature artifacts and exhibitions to educate visitors about the African diaspora and how it continues to affect culture, justice, and equality today.

While we could wax poetic about this picture-perfect destination all day, we think this reader quote sums it up quite nicely: “Charleston has a grace and civility like no other city. Come to eat, stay for the hospitality, and return for the beauty.”

View our full list of the 2022 Readers' Choice Award winners here.

Sullivan’s Island strikes the balance between beach town and small town

The year was 1971, and Everett Presson had yet to become a real estate icon with more million-dollar sales than any other agent in Charleston history. He was a teacher then, and he and his wife were each making about $5,600 a year. And yet they were still able to buy a home on Sullivan’s Island—one block from the beach, mind you—for $16,000.How things have changed on Sullivan’s Island, which is now a coastal enclave with a year-to-date median home sales value of $4.177 million, according to this year’s Ju...

The year was 1971, and Everett Presson had yet to become a real estate icon with more million-dollar sales than any other agent in Charleston history. He was a teacher then, and he and his wife were each making about $5,600 a year. And yet they were still able to buy a home on Sullivan’s Island—one block from the beach, mind you—for $16,000.

How things have changed on Sullivan’s Island, which is now a coastal enclave with a year-to-date median home sales value of $4.177 million, according to this year’s July figures from the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors. But back in the early 1970s, well before the sprawl of metro Charleston had reached the foot of the Ben Sawyer Bridge, it was still off-the-grid enough to be affordable.

“You had downtown people who lived there in the summer, and veterans from World War II who lived there year-round, because Sullivan’s Island was a very inexpensive place to buy a house,” recalled Presson, of Carolina One Real Estate, who lived on the island for 47 years. “It was cheaper than buying in Mount Pleasant. Back then we had blue-collar workers, carpenters and teachers who were living on Sullivan’s Island, and people from downtown who were summer residents. But there were a lot fewer year-round residents then than there are now, although that trend is beginning to change.”

Like many other barrier islands, Sullivan’s has seen its home values skyrocket, particularly in the wake of a coronavirus pandemic that freed many high earners to work from anywhere and sent people flocking to the beach for longer periods of time. But it’s not just proximity to the ocean that’s helped Sullivan’s Island become the most expensive ZIP code in the Palmetto State; the island is also that rare beach town that’s built around residents more than visitors, and still feels more like a community than a vacation spot. Sullivan’s Island has managed to be a beach town and a small town, all at once.

“It was developed organically—so technically, it wasn’t developed at all,” said Jimmy Dye, founding partner and Realtor at The Cassina Group, and also a longtime Sullivan’s Island resident. “There are no resorts, no golf courses, no hotels. It isn’t a gated community. But the biggest point is, this is all organic. You don’t have an atmosphere created by a developer like you would in many beach communities.”

If anything, that atmosphere has been crafted in part by the town’s government, which has taken measures—most notably, the outlawing of short-term rentals—to prevent residents from being overrun by visitors. The result is the best of both worlds, a beach town with easy public access to the ocean, but also a lived-in community with quiet residential streets and a vibrant, walkable downtown.

“As we’re moving into fall, the tourism is going to subside a bit and the Sullivan’s Island Elementary kids will be back in school. And you’ll see really neat things like a large group of those kids walking to Dunleavy’s after school to eat free popcorn and do their homework,” Dye said. “I walk my dogs early in the morning, around sunrise, and there’s a community of walkers and everyone says hello. People are generally happy, and it spreads. It really does have a small-town feel.”

‘They’re part of the community’

When did Sullivan’s Island begin to change from an affordable home to teachers and veterans to the exclusive, multi-million-dollar enclave it is today? Presson traces the beginning of that transformation to 1989 and Hurricane Hugo, which devastated the island and left the tilted Ben Sawyer Bridge as one of the storm’s most enduring images. The rebuilding process allowed for the construction of larger, more modern, and more expensive homes, and prices naturally began to escalate as a result.

After that, “Sullivan’s Island was discovered by people from away,” Presson added. “You know, it’s such a unique community that can’t be duplicated anywhere. You go anywhere up and down the East Coast and you look at beaches, and they have high rise condominiums, houses that are all jammed together, and a lot of commercialism. And you just don’t see that on Sullivan’s Island. Former town councils did a really good job of protecting what we what we have there.”

One move the town made was to stop allowing the subdivision of lots, to prevent the dense home development seen at many other beach communities. And then in 2000, town council took the step of outlawing short-term rentals, which it considers anything less than 28 days. The existing short-term rental permits that were grandfathered in came with strict limits—such as they have to be used, they don’t transfer to a different home if the owner moves, and they require that holders must obtain a business license—and over time have dwindled to about 38 today, Dye said.

“Quite frankly, it’s less invasive,” Dye said of only allowing long-term rentals. “The people that come here every year for 30 days are part of the community. They’re not just in and out. Some people have only a few families that will come down for a month each year. I know some people who come down every winter from New England, and every winter you’ll see them sitting out in the hot tub. They’re part of the community.”

Even the process of tearing down a 1950s-era beach cabin and building a new home comes with its own strict guidelines, particularly if the original structure is deemed historic by the town. In that case, it’s not unusual for the buyers of the property to have to incorporate all or part of the original home into the new construction. “It happens every day,” Dye said. Presson, a former town council member, said Sullivan’s Island is looking at tightening those guidelines even further to prevent buyers from simply building huge additions onto older homes.

It’s just another of those elements that makes Sullivan’s Island so unique among beach communities, and such a sought-after place to live among those with the means to afford it.

“The only time you really feel like you’re living in a beach community would be on the weekends in the summer,” Presson said. “But we have our own elementary school, we have a library, we have our own mayor and council, and people are very active in politics over there. There’s a real feel of community there. People with a lot of money from other places have discovered it, but it’s still a wonderful place to live.”

Four move-in ready homes

Homes on Sullivan’s Island have always been in demand. But when coronavirus lockdowns were lifted in the summer of 2020, the real estate market on the island exploded as buyers sought beach retreats for their families amid the early months of the pandemic. In March of 2020, the year-to-date average sales price of a Sullivan’s Island home was $2.25 million, according to CTAR. By July of 2022, that year-to-date sales average had ballooned to $4.779 million.

What happened? “If Sullivan’s had been in the back of your mind for a long, long time, then you probably decided to go ahead and move forward with it,” Dye said. The pandemic accelerated many trends that were already in progress, among them a scramble to find beachfront property—either as a second home, or in the new work-from-home era, as a primary residence.

“What Covid did all over the world was make people reassess their situation,” Dye added. Sullivan’s Island “has always been strong regionally, among people from Atlanta, Charlotte and Greenville. But I’ve had three different clients from the Northeast, trying to move before the start of school and get kids into Sullivan’s Island Elementary. We’ve had strong interest from Boston, New York, Long Island, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and even some California folks who have ties to the South.”

The onset of the Covid pandemic led many owners of second homes on Sullivan’s Island to flee the large cities of the Northeast and wait out the worst of the outbreak on the beach. “Sales just increased dramatically,” Presson said. That buying frenzy left behind little in the way of available inventory—entering Labor Day weekend, the island had just 10 listings. Three of those aren’t even built yet, Dye pointed out, while three others are likely teardowns.

“So as far as move-in ready houses, you’re talking about four,” Dye added. “That’s really low.”

But it’s also the norm on the island right now. “It’s been like that this year,” Dye said. “You’re seeing a lot of off-the-market transactions, people literally knocking on doors asking if residents are interested in selling their homes. I would say there’s usually four to six move-in-ready homes on the island. At a low point, it might drop down to three.”

It’s not just a matter of scarcity, but also turnover—Sullivan’s Island saw over 60 sales in 2021, Presson said, but “the listings came and they left, and there was no stock on the shelf,” he added. The two sales of single-family detached homes on the island in July averaged just 10 days on the market, and the yearly average is 32. Interested in building a home, but don’t want the hassle of dealing with a tear-down? As of late August, Dye said there were just two available lots on Sullivan’s Island that didn’t have a structure on them.

The Sullivan’s market is tight, no matter how you use an oyster knife to cut it, and that only further escalates price. Recent sales have included a coastal showpiece of a home built in 2019 that went for $6 million, a shaded retreat with a pool that fetched $7 million, and a 6,000-square foot island-style home with panoramic views of Charleston Harbor that closed for $10.4 million. Current listings include an oceanfront home renovated by Charleston interior designer Jenny Keenan and Dufford Young Architects and priced at $11.4 million.

And as for the home that Presson and his wife bought for $16,000 back in 1971? It’s still standing, and it’s in the midst of a multi-year renovation. Like everything else on Sullivan’s Island, the value has increased exponentially—and yet, it’s still managing to remain true to its roots.

“Somebody bought it maybe three years ago for $1.8 million,” Presson said. “They’re completely redoing it, but it looks exactly the same from the outside. So that’s nice.”

How to Spend a Perfect Weekend in Charleston

Charleston, South Carolina has been a mainstay on lists of America’s top destinations for nearly a decade, with its dramatic oaks and pastel-hued homes. Founded in 1660, the historic coastal city was the site of the first shots of the Civil War and has hosted the likes of Blackbeard and Edgar Allan Poe. Today, there are hundreds of incredible restaurants, with a high volume of James Beard Award winners.Visitors love snapping photos of Rainbow Row, a colorful section of some of the city’s oldest homes, and the historic mark...

Charleston, South Carolina has been a mainstay on lists of America’s top destinations for nearly a decade, with its dramatic oaks and pastel-hued homes. Founded in 1660, the historic coastal city was the site of the first shots of the Civil War and has hosted the likes of Blackbeard and Edgar Allan Poe. Today, there are hundreds of incredible restaurants, with a high volume of James Beard Award winners.

Visitors love snapping photos of Rainbow Row, a colorful section of some of the city’s oldest homes, and the historic market. Looking ahead to the future, the new International African American Museum will open in January 2023, honoring the legacy of the enslaved people forced to work on Charleston’s plantations.

I spent my twenties living in one of the country’s most beautiful places and have spent much of my career singing its praises. And while downtown has its charms, there’s more to the city than just the peninsula. To help you along should you be planning a visit, here’s how to plan the perfect Charleston weekend.

How to Get There

Charleston International Airport has a number of nonstop routes from major cities like Chicago, Seattle, Miami, New York City and Washington, D.C. Amtrak and Greyhound also have stops in North Charleston, an easy taxi ride from downtown. It’s a five-hour drive from Atlanta, Georgia and 3.5 hours from Charlotte, North Carolina.

Where to Stay

Since travel and hospitality is the biggest industry in the city, visitors have a wealth of options when it comes to hotels. It really depends on your budget and which area you want to be based in.

Emeline is a stylish boutique hotel steps away from the city market and its many restaurants. That said, should you stay here, don’t miss Frannie & The Fox, the hotel’s restaurant with playful Italian fare and “cocktail windows” where you ring a bell and receive your drink from behind the wall. Their rooms also have record players and a selection of LPs to spin.

Across the bridge in the charming Old Village of Mount Pleasant, Post House is a seven-room boutique hotel and restaurant, the latter of which features incredible dishes like fish curry paired with locally-grown rice. Borrow one of their bikes to explore the neighborhood.

For unrivaled beach access, Wild Dunes on Isle of Palms is your best bet. The resort has two distinct hotels featuring large rooms with balconies, several restaurants, and activities like golf, tennis and a spa. Don’t miss The Nest, the rooftop bar, for tropical beverages and sunset views.

What to Do

Day 1: Downtown and North Charleston

On your way into the city, detour to the oft-overlooked area of North Charleston, which is known for being home to the airport, an outlet mall and performing arts venues. But go a bit further and you’ll find Park Circle, a charming planned neighborhood with excellent restaurants like EVO Pizzeria and Jackrabbit Filly. Firefly Distillery, creator of the original sweet tea vodka (among many other spirits), relocated to the area a few years ago and offers live music and food trucks.

The old Charleston Naval Base is also worth a drive through. Since it was decommissioned in 1996, the buildings have been used as locations for television shows and movies as well as a music festival site. When you’re ready for a drink, it’s an easy drive to the city’s brewery district in what’s called “The Neck,” the stretch between North Charleston and the Eastside. Don’t miss Edmund’s Oast, an excellent brewery and restaurant specializing in German-style beers.

Most visitors flock to downtown Charleston to roam the cobblestone streets and admire the iconic row houses. While you’re here, start at the Charleston Museum, the nation’s oldest, dating back to 1773, which covers the history of the city with artifacts from before America’s founding. There are about a dozen historic homes you can tour, depending on your interest level. But the best option is wandering around by foot.

The Gibbes Museum of Art has pieces like sweetgrass baskets and art from the Charleston Renaissance, a period of creativity that followed World War I. The City Market sells a range of souvenirs, but it’s the sweetgrass baskets woven by Gullah artisans that are the most notable.

Charleston is known for its award-winning restaurants, but if you want to get into the hottest tables in town, like Husk or The Ordinary, you’ll need to nab a reservation or go early. If you can’t get a table, look for alternatives away from downtown like Leon’s Oyster Shop or Rodney Scott’s BBQ.

Day 2: Mount Pleasant

Cross the iconic diamond-shaped Ravenel Bridge to the community of Mount Pleasant. The Old Village neighborhood is like a time capsule, appearing on screen in The Notebook and Netflix’s Outer Banks. Explore on foot or borrow a bike to navigate the streets.

Shem Creek is the seafood capital of the city, with shrimp boats lining the water to provide the freshest ingredients to restaurants. You can’t go wrong with just about any of them, but The Wreck of the Richard and Charlene is a local legend, and still family owned. Go early to enjoy the sunset views over a local beer and Lowcountry fare like fried oysters and deviled crab. Nico is another option, with French-inspired and wood-fired dishes, and plenty of rosé. If you visit during the day, kayak the creek with one of the local outfitters to spot dolphins and countless species of bird.

Further into Mount Pleasant is Town Center, a typical suburban outdoor mall. But there are some great restaurants to detour to on your way east. Malika Canteen is among them, the first Pakistani restaurant in South Carolina. Get the thali, which lets you try a number of small dishes.

After a bite to eat, stop by Palmetto Islands County Park, a nearly 1,000-acre space with boardwalks over the marsh and bicycle paths. Bring your binoculars to spot birds and a picnic for when you get peckish.

Day 3: The Beaches

You can’t come to Charleston without going to the beach! There are a number of options, but locals love laid-back Sullivan’s Island, a 15-minute drive from downtown. You’ll find that Middle Street is lined with bars and restaurants: Poe’s Tavern is named for Edgar Allan Poe, who was stationed at the nearby fort, and offers burgers and fish tacos; The Obstinate Daughter pulls from French, Spanish and Italian influences; and you can settle in for tropical drinks and wood-grilled shrimp at The Longboard.

Find a spot on the beach near the odd black-and-white Sullivan’s Island Lighthouse (Station 18 ½ is my favorite) or learn about the island’s role in the Civil War at Fort Moultrie. During World War I, the fort was used to watch out for submarines.

Since Sullivan’s Island doesn’t have hotels, plan on basing yourself on neighboring Isle of Palms, which has various stores if you need any essentials. Drive past the grand beachfront McMansions on your way to Wild Dunes Resort or start with a meal at one of the isle’s eateries.

Catch the sunset at The Boathouse at Breach Inlet, which focuses on local seafood. Islander 71 is found at the recently remodeled marina, where you can grab a bite before heading out on the water on a kayaking tour or hop across the creek to Goat Island. Finally, at the end of the night, catch live music at The Windjammer, a legendary local venue.

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Sullivan's Island residents launch campaign to get rid of fractional ownership homes

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island banned short-term rentals more than two decades ago, except those that were grandfathered in.Residents are concerned with one company they say is bending the rules.Tim Emrich says the home, located at 3115 Ion Avenue, has fractional ownership and is overseen by Pacaso.Emrich said Sullivan's Island is for families and retirees, not people on vacation, and with three children, they don’t want to live next to a home with many different owners.According to...

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island banned short-term rentals more than two decades ago, except those that were grandfathered in.

Residents are concerned with one company they say is bending the rules.

Tim Emrich says the home, located at 3115 Ion Avenue, has fractional ownership and is overseen by Pacaso.

Emrich said Sullivan's Island is for families and retirees, not people on vacation, and with three children, they don’t want to live next to a home with many different owners.

According to him, other residents on Sullivan's Island share his opinion and are not happy about it.

To try and stop it, he and his wife created a campaign to keep Sullivan's Island community oriented.

"We saw an advertisement where you could buy 1/8 of the house. After we dug a little deeper, it became apparent that this was, this is really a scheme to circumvent the rules that have been in place for over 20 years in a small town that limit short-term rentals; they prohibit them unless you were one of the properties prior 20 years ago," Emrich said.

Driving up and down streets on Sullivan's Island, you can't miss the signs that read "Stop timeshares on Sullivan's."

Emrich and his wife passed around the yard signs and have been attending town council meetings to try and stop Pacaso from selling homes on the barrier island.

"Our aim is to first of all raise awareness. We've obviously got over 200 signs out across the island. Any residents you speak to on Sullivan's Island adamantly oppose this game. Every member of the council is opposed to the scheme. And so, really, we're pushing the politicians to do something about it," Emrich said.

Emrich tells us the campaign's primary goal is to get town leaders to enforce the rules that are already on the books and push these types of companies and homes out.

He says communities across the country have successfully fought these types of companies.

"They're assuring us that they are on this. The government does not move this fast, and we would like them to, but they are giving us every assurance that they that they're going to do something about it," Emrich said.

Mayor Patrick O'Neil says residents feel short-term rentals destroy the sense of neighborhood.

He thinks no one wants to live next to a group of people on their first night of vacation.

“After a great deal of research and study, last week we issued a notice of zoning violation to the owners of the property in question here, and we are awaiting a response," Mayor O'Brien said.

Pacaso spokesperson Brian McGuigan stated: "Pacaso is not a timeshare. We help families co-own second homes, which is common practice and can help reduce competition for single-family homes on Sullivan's Island. Research shows that co-ownership contributes more to the local economy than the typical second home while redirecting second home buyers away from median-priced single-family homes in demand by locals and into high-end, luxury homes.”

Pacaso explains they aren’t a timeshare and retain no ownership interest in the home once sold, but they provide property management services.

Pacaso insists they will collaborate with Sullivan's Island leaders on any related public policy questions.

The company believes an ordinance addressing Pacaso’s model could broadly impact many houses.

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

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