Criminal Defense Attorney in North Charleston, SC

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Fighting For You

When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients’ cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring – a criminal defense attorney on North Charleston, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

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What Clients Say About Us

Richard Waring

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in North Charleston

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry’s history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of North Charleston’s legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in North Charleston, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system’s ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in North Charleston:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense
Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In North Charleston, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In North Charleston, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney’s role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime – a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in North Charleston, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in North Charleston, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Knowing Your Rights
Knowing Your Rights

Criminal Case Timeline In North Charleston, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in North Charleston, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone – most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of North Charleston’s criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Arrest And Investigation

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Initial Bond Setting

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in North Charleston, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Preliminary Hearing

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Initial Appearance

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Plea Offers

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant’s acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Discovery

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in North Charleston, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Indictment

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a “count.” During this phase, the State will gather a “grand jury” comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant’s case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor’s job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client’s innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution’s case.

Typically, a trial in North Charleston includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State’s Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense’s Case
  • The State’s Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in North Charleston

North Charleston police to recruit 10 bilingual cops from Puerto Rico

NORTH CHARLESTON — The city’s Police Department is in need of more bilingual officers to cover a population where 11.4 percent of residents identify as Hispanic.They have found a new hiring pool: a university in Puerto Rico.North Charleston police are partnering with the University of Puerto Rico to hire and train at least 10 people next year to serve as bilingual officers. The new hires will be graduates of the university’s public safety program where students can obtain degrees in criminal justice.The...

NORTH CHARLESTON — The city’s Police Department is in need of more bilingual officers to cover a population where 11.4 percent of residents identify as Hispanic.

They have found a new hiring pool: a university in Puerto Rico.

North Charleston police are partnering with the University of Puerto Rico to hire and train at least 10 people next year to serve as bilingual officers. The new hires will be graduates of the university’s public safety program where students can obtain degrees in criminal justice.

The department will hire people who are Boricua, or of Puerto Rican descent. As a U.S. territory, residents of Puerto Rico are citizens of the United States.

“A lot of people from here who are bilingual may not want to be cops,” Chief Reggie Burgess said. “You have to go where people have the desire.”

There are 332 officers with the North Charleston Police Department, yet only about 20 officers speak Spanish, according to the department.

Burgess said it is crucial for police to bridge communication barriers. A diverse force with more bilingual officers can show people the department cares about their issues, he said.

“There is no way in any world we can serve the people if we don’t be about the people,” he said.

It’s been difficult for North Charleston police to hire officers who are from the Lowcountry. In 2020, the department hired 16 people, none of whom were Hispanic. The department hired 28 people in 2021, including two Hispanic officers.

All the while the Hispanic population has been growing in South Carolina, which has seen an increase of 117,156 Hispanic residents between 2010 and 2020.

The Hispanic and Latino population in North Charleston alone hovers around 13,100, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

“The few officers we have now who speak Spanish are overworked because they are always called in to translate,” said Rhonda Jerome, a City Council member representing District 2, which has a significant Latino community.

Oftentimes the language barrier is so dire that children are burdened with the task of translating for their parents, which is difficult when they are communicating about complex concepts, Jerome said.

It also strains bilingual community leaders who are repeatedly asked to translate for officers, said Lydia Cotton, a member of North Charleston’s Hispanic community.

Cotton said it was difficult for her and others to take on this extra responsibility.

Between 2016 and 2020, North Charleston officers made 24,759 arrests, according to a 2021 audit of the department. About 7.5 percent of arrestees are Hispanic, the numbers showed.

Recruiting officers from Puerto Rico is seen as a bridge toward increasing the department’s number of Latino cops, who might better empathize with aspects of Hispanic culture, said Sharon Rivera-Doublin, a community member working with police to implement the program.

“People in the community want to see people like them in the department,” Rivera-Doublin said. “They want to be able to relate to officers, and to tell them something in Spanish without having to worry that it is going to be misinterpreted.”

There are five officers who identify as Hispanic in the department. Only one employee is Hispanic among the department’s additional 58 civilian staff members.

The audit found officers lacked training on basic issues specific to immigrants, such as how to obtain a driver’s license. The audit also said police should better explain the services North Charleston provides, such as its involvement with deportation.

“We are not federal employees,” Burgess, who is African American, said. “We work for the city of North Charleston. I don’t have any jurisdiction to say who can be here or not. Hey, my people came in 1619. We weren’t born here. So how can I tell someone who can be here and who cannot?”

North Charleston police and other community members will go to Puerto Rico at the beginning of 2022 to promote the program, said Chiquanna Giles, recruitment manager at the North Charleston police.

They will return for a week in the spring to assess prospective candidates and make offers from there. Once new officers are hired, the department will help them transition to the Lowcountry, including helping them with their initial food and housing needs.

If the Latino community sees more officers like them, perhaps more of the community would want to become officers too, Burgess said.

Sapakoff: The perfect fit to lead the S.C. Athletic Hall of Fame

Some people get bored in retirement. Andy Solomon established a board.A friend asked if he was crazy to accept the role of South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame executive director at a busy time when the organization is lobbying for a permanent museum site.“Of course,” replied Solomon, 66. “But life’s too short. Let’s have fun.”He’s the perfect person to take over for Ephraim Ulmer, who stepped down as SCAHOF ex...

Some people get bored in retirement. Andy Solomon established a board.

A friend asked if he was crazy to accept the role of South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame executive director at a busy time when the organization is lobbying for a permanent museum site.

“Of course,” replied Solomon, 66. “But life’s too short. Let’s have fun.”

He’s the perfect person to take over for Ephraim Ulmer, who stepped down as SCAHOF executive director after 25 years. No one in South Carolina is more connected to more South Carolina sports things than Solomon.

He was the first sports information director at College of Charleston, his alma mater, the first SID at Winthrop and worked at Charleston Southern and Limestone.

That was before Solomon worked for 27 years at The Citadel while spending a lot of time at South Carolina and Clemson as an NCAA Baseball Tournament site representative.

Solomon’s gregarious networking is perhaps best summed up in his role in growing a breakfast club composed mostly of former coaches. Participants in the group originally formed by Lowcountry insurance agent Tom McQueeny vary, but those who attend or have dropped by at Page’s Okra Grill in Mount Pleasant include Les Robinson, Ralph Friedgen, Al Skinner, Roy Williams, Bobby Johnson, Bobby Cremins, Teddy Valentine and Fisher DeBerry.

No wonder Solomon earned the nickname “The Facilitator.”

In his new gig, The Facilitator is looking for a facility.

First SCHAOF goal: get the honoree train back on schedule after the 2021 ceremony was canceled because of COVID-19. The seven-member Class of 2020 includes Todd Ellis, C.J. Spiller, Gaylord Perry, Dan Driessen, Roberta Williams, Peter Boulware and Ed Lynch and will be inducted at the 60th annual SCAHOF banquet on May 23 at the Columbia Convention Center along with a four-member Class of 2022 to be named Jan. 20.

Second goal: a museum.

“We have two options,” Solomon said. “Do it ourselves or get the state legislature to help us.”

Solomon is leaning legislature, hoping there is COVID-19 money available to help a non-profit organization raise approximately $2 million and do something good for the Palmetto State.

A big check from a corporate sponsor, however, is welcome.

The state athletic halls of fame in North Carolina (Raleigh), Georgia (Macon) and Virginia (Virginia Beach) have museum sites. Solomon thinks South Carolina sports enthusiasts deserve one, too.

“It’s a preservation of history,” said Solomon, a Charleston native. “It’s a preservation of athletic history and it’s a preservation of heroes and legends. In South Carolina, we take our sports pretty seriously and we need a place to showcase that history.”

The strength of the SCAHOF has always been a sweet unison of achievement celebration (Solomon hopes to occasionally hold the annual ceremony away from its Columbia base with stops in Charleston, Myrtle Beach, Greenville and Rock Hill).

The fun of sports glory ranges from football to horse racing (though no horses have been inducted).

From baseball to NASCAR (no cars either).

Typically, Solomon said, over 200 nominees must be whittled down to class of inductees every given year.

SCAHOF flaws have included athletes and other contributors slipping through the cracks. The classic case is someone from a small town in South Carolina or somewhere outside Columbia (home of most board members) who didn’t play in college in the state.

Art Shell, one of South Carolina’s two or three most accomplished athletes and also an NFL head coach, was selected for Pro Football Hall of Fame enshrinement before he was honored by the SCHOF. Shell grew up in North Charleston and went to Maryland State.

Hilton Head’s Dan Driessen, 70, is way overdue as part of the 2020 class: 1,464 hits over 15 Major League seasons from 1973 to 1987, including key roles on Cincinnati’s Big Red Machine teams that won the 1975 and 1976 World Series.

Somehow, Mike McGee is not in. The late former University of South Carolina athletic director is right there with Dabo Swinney and Dawn Staley among the most important figures in Palmetto State college athletics over the last half-century. He hired the Gamecocks’ most successful football coach, Steve Spurrier, and two-time College World Series winner Ray Tanner, among other accomplishments.

The SCAHOF should have a better understanding of pop culture.

Darius Rucker and other Hootie & the Blowfish band members haven’t just done a lot for charity with their golf tournaments (including a popular college tournament and the jovial Monday After The Masters) but have represented the state around the world as superfans.

Bill Murray’s impact as the Charleston RiverDogs’ Director of Fun, as guest picker on ESPN’s GameDay and as a Charleston sports ambassador is very SCAHOF worthy. He was inducted into the South Atlantic League Hall of Fame in 2012 for his contributions to baseball in Charleston and elsewhere.

Rucker and Murray displays would sure be fun at the new museum.

Again, Solomon is the ideal facilitator for all this.

He pushed for Driessen’s induction for years. He saw Murray in action while working for the RiverDogs and knows the importance of a good athletic director.

Solomon worked on the SCHOF board of directors for 15 years and closely with Ulmer since 2018. He’s well-acquainted with his revised board and executive committee, a steadfast group of more than 60 people.

All of them, including Solomon, serve as volunteers.

Mostly, Solomon knows how to (gently) twist arms to get SCAHOF things done as a tribute to the past and for sports fans of the future.

“I have a Political Science degree from College of Charleston and a Masters in History from Winthrop,” Solomon said with a chuckle. “In this job, I’m using my college degrees.”

Free dental clinic expands in North Charleston, partnership between dentists and church

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Hundreds of people will soon be able to receive free dental services due to an expansion of a partnership between a North Charleston church and a non-profit dental clinic.Since first opening in 1998, North Charleston Dental Outreach said it has provided more than $375,000 worth of dental care for people in the community.Come summer of 2022, North Charleston Dental Outreach will have a new home. While the non-profit has been offering free dental care to people for more than 20 years, organizers said it&...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Hundreds of people will soon be able to receive free dental services due to an expansion of a partnership between a North Charleston church and a non-profit dental clinic.

Since first opening in 1998, North Charleston Dental Outreach said it has provided more than $375,000 worth of dental care for people in the community.

Come summer of 2022, North Charleston Dental Outreach will have a new home. While the non-profit has been offering free dental care to people for more than 20 years, organizers said it’s time for an expansion to reach more people in the community.

The new location will be right next door to the Destiny Worship Center off Azalea Drive in North Charleston. People will be able to walk in and receive free dental services like emergency surgeries, teeth cleanings and removals.

Dr. Bill Sasser and Pastor Larry Goss formed a partnership to offer dental care for many people in the community who don’t have insurance or can’t afford care from a private dental practice.

“Partner with people who know the people in this community more than we do. That’s why we’re excited for this partnership because they’re right there in the community and can direct us on the right path,” said Dr. Sasser, Dental Director of North Charleston Dental Outreach.

The current clinic has three treatment rooms but organizers said it barely has any space for equipment or patients and has outdated technology.

Dr. Sasser and Pastor Goss said the new clinic will be double the size of the current location off Reynolds Avenue. They said it’ll also be fully handicap accessible, have updated technology, and will provide more education and preventative dental measures for patients.

“Not only will people receive services they need or can’t afford, but they can have connections. So after they’ve received dental services, they can come over to the church or food distribution to get resources for them as well,” said Larry Goss, Senior Pastor of the Destiny Worship Center.

The clinic operates with about 20 volunteers. Some are dentists from private practices, and others are dental students from MUSC. Organizers said they hope the new expansion will bring more volunteers to provide more services. The clinic said funds for the expansion came from community donations and some grants.

The clinic said free services aren’t only limited to people in North Charleston since they’ve had patients travel from Walterboro, Orangeburg and North Carolina.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Feds raid North Charleston store, seize counterfeit sports jerseys

A sports apparel business previously located in the Northwoods Mall was raided last month by federal authorities investigating the sale of counterfeit clothing.Homeland Security Investigations’ Charleston office executed a federal search warrant on Dec. 14 at Game Over Sports as part of an investigation into allegations the store’s owner was selling counterfeit sports jerseys, according to federal records filed on Jan. 10 in U.S. District Court.A variety of jerseys seized from the business were determined to be phon...

A sports apparel business previously located in the Northwoods Mall was raided last month by federal authorities investigating the sale of counterfeit clothing.

Homeland Security Investigations’ Charleston office executed a federal search warrant on Dec. 14 at Game Over Sports as part of an investigation into allegations the store’s owner was selling counterfeit sports jerseys, according to federal records filed on Jan. 10 in U.S. District Court.

A variety of jerseys seized from the business were determined to be phony, records show.

Criminal charges have not been filed.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Derek Shoemake said he could not comment, saying only, “The filings speak for themselves.”

Lanard “Larry” Smith, the owner of the business, said in an interview on Jan. 12 he did not know the sports jerseys were counterfeit.

“The person that I was ordering stuff from, they said everything was legit. I had no clue until they came into the store,” Smith said.

Smith and his brother were previously convicted of trafficking in counterfeit apparel in 2008. Both men were sentenced to three years probation.

An operator at Northwoods Mall said Game Over Sports closed on Dec. 16.

The S.C. Secretary of State’s Office first alerted HSI in August that the business was suspected of selling counterfeit goods, according to an application for a federal warrant to seize property.

A federal cargo tracking database showed that four dozen shipments of clothing arrived at the business earlier in the year. The cargo came from countries such as Japan, Malaysia, China and Hong Kong.

Similar international cargo addressed to the brother and another man was also shipped to a Summerville apartment from June 2019 until May, records show.

At least seven of the international shippers were associated with intellectual property rights violations, according to the records.

An employee of the Secretary of State’s Office purchased suspected counterfeit apparel, including a Kobe Bryant Los Angeles Lakers basketball jersey purported to be made by Nike, from the store on Sept. 28.

An investigator with a private company that specializes in intellectual property rights inspected the basketball jersey, purchased for $150, and determined it was a knock-off, records state.

Investigators determined other jerseys seized in the Dec. 14 raid were also counterfeit, according to records.

In addition to the jerseys, federal authorities seized more than $100,000 from the business’ bank accounts, records state.

Lanard Smith said on Jan. 12 he planned to retain legal counsel.

Charleston Animal Society helps spay, neuter nearly 700 animals amid vet shortage

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – The Charleston Animal Society is continuing its efforts to save shelter animals held up in the nationwide veterinarian shortage.On Sunday, Charleston Animal Society announced its completion of two weeks worth of spaying and neutering operations for dogs and cats in animal shelters located in 11 different counties, throughout every region of the state.The organization completed 686 spaying and neutering surgeries.“Charleston Animal Society doesn’t just ‘react’ ...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – The Charleston Animal Society is continuing its efforts to save shelter animals held up in the nationwide veterinarian shortage.

On Sunday, Charleston Animal Society announced its completion of two weeks worth of spaying and neutering operations for dogs and cats in animal shelters located in 11 different counties, throughout every region of the state.

The organization completed 686 spaying and neutering surgeries.

“Charleston Animal Society doesn’t just ‘react’ to problems, we get out there and find solutions,” says Charleston Animal Society President and CEO Joe Elmore.

State law prohibits shelter animals to be adopted without being spayed or neutered. Due to the veterinarian shortage, many animals cannot be spayed or neutered, which means they can’t be adopted.

Veterinarians from across the country were recruited through the No Kill South Carolina 2024 initiative to help push the spay and neutering operations.

447 of the surgeries were completed during the latest spay-neuter Week from December 6 to December 11 with veterinarians flown in from Illinois, Florida, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. 239 surgeries were completed during the first spay-neuter week held in November with veterinarians from North Carolina, Ohio and Colorado.

More information can be found at CharlestonAnimalSociety.org/SC-Spay-Neuter.

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