Criminal Defense Attorney in Nexton, SC

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Fighting For You

When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients' cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring - a criminal defense attorney on Nexton, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

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Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

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Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in Nexton

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry's history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of Nexton's legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in Nexton, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system's ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in Nexton:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In Nexton, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney's role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime - a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Nexton, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Nexton, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Criminal Case Timeline In Nexton, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in Nexton, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone - most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of Nexton's criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in Nexton, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant's acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in Nexton, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a "count." During this phase, the State will gather a "grand jury" comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant's case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor's job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client's innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution's case.

Typically, a trial in Nexton includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State's Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense's Case
  • The State's Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in Nexton, SC

Jedburg Road residents fight to keep moratorium in Berkeley Co.

Traffic, flooding and overall security. These are just a few of the concerns that people who live on Jedburg Road have about possible developments.BERKELEY COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Traffic, flooding and overall security. These are just a few of the concerns that people who live on Jedburg Road have about possible developments.“I wanted the ruralness. I wanted the size of the lots. I wanted the, you know, quietness,” resident Jonathan Lee said.This is what people who live on Jedburg Road wanted when they first mo...

Traffic, flooding and overall security. These are just a few of the concerns that people who live on Jedburg Road have about possible developments.

BERKELEY COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Traffic, flooding and overall security. These are just a few of the concerns that people who live on Jedburg Road have about possible developments.

“I wanted the ruralness. I wanted the size of the lots. I wanted the, you know, quietness,” resident Jonathan Lee said.

This is what people who live on Jedburg Road wanted when they first moved to the area. But with this possible new development coming in...

“It would increase traffic dramatically and it would increase, you know, flooding in a zone that already floods when it drizzles rain outside on a regular day,” resident Mike Penn said.

Pulte Homes, a developer, has applied to Berkeley County for the second time to lift the building moratorium on Jedburg Road If it is lifted, 465 homes will be built on 227 acres along with a possible new school. In a second community meeting, dozens of people who live here say they do not want this to happen.

“The sheriff was just here a couple nights ago and talking about how they’re already 30 police officers down. They can’t get people no matter how much they’re offering to pay. They just can’t get the people. You add another 460 homes, what’s that going to do for security purposes?” resident Robert Faas said.

Another option that Pulte Homes discussed was building around 300 homes on about 200 acres. Community members say this option is better, but they don’t want their country land to go away.

“We don’t want to live in a Cane Bay. We don’t want to live in a Nexton. We don’t want to live in a Pulte Homes subdivision. We want to live in our own land and, you know, have our peace and quiet,” resident Mike Penn said.

“They want to move to our community. Well, what are you going to do for us? Because there’s got to be a give and a take and I recognize that, but if you just take everything, well then, the community’s lost and everyone existing in the community just winds up leaving,” resident Jonathan Lee said.

Pulte Homes declined to comment. They said in the meeting that the next step is to take comments from tonight’s and last week’s community meetings and make possible changes to the plan before submitting it. They’re going to look at doing more of a corridor study and revisit the flex one option before the county reviews it on Nov. 14.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Berkeley voters pass 2 referendums to fund roads, schools

MONCKS CORNER — Voters approved two separate 1 percent sales taxes to pay for infrastructure and school construction projects in rapidly developing Berkeley County.The infrastructure tax, which will be collected by the county, passed with 74 percent of the vote. The education capital improvements tax, which will be collected by the Berkeley County School District, passed with 71 percent of the vote.The infrastructure tax is a continuation of a seven-year tax voters first approved in 2008 to pay for road improvements throu...

MONCKS CORNER — Voters approved two separate 1 percent sales taxes to pay for infrastructure and school construction projects in rapidly developing Berkeley County.

The infrastructure tax, which will be collected by the county, passed with 74 percent of the vote. The education capital improvements tax, which will be collected by the Berkeley County School District, passed with 71 percent of the vote.

The infrastructure tax is a continuation of a seven-year tax voters first approved in 2008 to pay for road improvements throughout the county. Officials have touted the completion of projects like Phase 1 of the widening on Clements Ferry Road as proof of the tax’s success.

The referendum also asked voters to approve $89 million in obligation bonds to pay for initial projects while the tax is first being collected. It will be repaid with money from the tax. Voters passed it with 71 percent of the vote.

The infrastructure tax will pay for a $74 million second phase of widening Clements Ferry on Daniel Island; two phases, each about $30.4 million, of widening Henry Brown Boulevard in Goose Creek; $58 million worth of widening and intersection improvements along Interstate 26 in the Jedburg area; and a $61 million widening project of U.S. Highway 176 between U.S. 17A and Nexton Parkway.

Ten percent of the money collected from the tax will go to preserve green space throughout the county. It received support from several conservation groups, including the Coastal Conservation League and the Conservation Voters of South Carolina.

“In poll after poll, voters say Berkeley County is growing too fast, leading to record losses of open space and wildlife habitat, polluting our rivers and lakes, and threatening our quality of life,” John Tynan, executive director of CVSC, said in a statement. “With today’s overwhelming YES vote on the transportation and greenspace referendum, Berkeley County voters sent a resounding message that they value their quality of life and the environment.”

The education capital projects is a new seven-year tax that will pay for three new schools, additions to four more and improvements to each of the high schools’ athletic facilities.

“I want to extend a heartfelt thank you to our community for their support and commitment to our students and schools,” said district Superintendent Deon Jackson in a statement Nov. 9. “Our students deserve first class facilities and ample space to learn. With this overwhelming vote in favor of the educational capital improvements referendum, we will get to work planning for and completing the projects as approved.”

The district is growing by as many as 1,000 students a year as more people move into developments like Nexton, Carnes Crossroads and Cane Bay.

District officials have said they will look into other ways to fund the capital projects if the referendum does not pass.

Rotary rails over I-26 expansion roundabouts

Local engineer Chris Wood’s presentation of SCDOT’s $179 million-plus structural undertaking comprising the widening of I-26 and new SC 27 Interchange was no mundane nuts-and-bolts rundown.During his appearance at the Rotary Club of Summerville’s Nov. 2 meeting at the Nexton Hilton Garden Inn, organization members peppered the keynote speaker with doubts and concerns about two forthcoming roundabouts along the interchange site area near the Walmart Distribution Center in Ridgeville.Wood, a construction service...

Local engineer Chris Wood’s presentation of SCDOT’s $179 million-plus structural undertaking comprising the widening of I-26 and new SC 27 Interchange was no mundane nuts-and-bolts rundown.

During his appearance at the Rotary Club of Summerville’s Nov. 2 meeting at the Nexton Hilton Garden Inn, organization members peppered the keynote speaker with doubts and concerns about two forthcoming roundabouts along the interchange site area near the Walmart Distribution Center in Ridgeville.

Wood, a construction services project manager for the HDR design firm of North Charleston, led off the PowerPoint overview by describing the multilayered roadwork as a “substantial” and “challenging” project aimed at expanding seven miles of the I-26 from mile marker 187 to mile marker 193. Further, the one-time Naval officer walked the audience through a summary of an interchange construction — in the form of a 192-foot bridge — at Ridgeville Road to promote better traffic flow.

The mere mention of the soon-to-be-built interchange set off a series of questions from multiple club members in attendance, with one Rotarian pointedly asking Wood to list the advantages— if any — of two roundabouts and/or traffic signal/signage alternatives near the Walmart storage facility.

The civil engineer offered that the tight circular roundabout structures serve the purpose of adding a constant flow of traffic that — he estimated — works well with mid-level conditions of highway car travel.

“In other words, this isn’t high volume yet, so it keeps traffic moving under mid-level volumes of traffic,” detailed Wood, who reminded listeners that he is neither the design engineer nor a DOT authority who selected the roundabout method.

A fellow PE in the room questioned the functionality and purpose of roundabouts and the difficulties that they would present to regular drivers in light of the preponderance of large trucks that would traversing the make-shift, circular junction.

Wood explained that the roundabouts would be large enough to handle trucks coming from the Walmart site. He also mentioned how the curving of the circling structures would allow the trucks to navigate the roundabouts, while pointing out that the surrounding concrete would be sturdy enough to withstand the weight of the large vehicles.

Roundabouts are nothing new and have, in fact, been in existence for over 100 years, according to reports. However, their usage hasn’t always garnered public support due to instances where cars entering the traffic circle wind up frequently having the right-of-way over cars that are already in that same circle.

Other traditional cons concerning the viability of roundabouts stem from driver uncertainty about yielding, the overabundance of merge points, driver speed, motorists who try to cut the roundabout and cyclist/pedestrian shoulder lanes that are sometimes deemed as too narrow, potentially endangering those parties.

Wood’s description of the work continued with his narration of project elements regarding the construction of the S-32 Cypress Campground Road Bridge and the new I-26 bridge over Cypress Swamp.

The most formidable challenge of the DOT venture, he observed, is the installation of six box culverts (i.e. structural drainage that spans from one side of the road to the other).

“They’re substantial in size. You’re talking about this one here is a 287-foot, triple-barrel, 10′ x 9′ box culvert across the highway, so I mean, I hope it would be adequate to prevent situations like what you’re talking about,” said Wood in response to a Rotarian’s recollection of the addition of the 1-26 negatively impacting and/or impeding the backflow of area waterways.

“I would think that the new systems would be larger than the existing [ones] to handle these larger rain events. You make me want to check that when I go back, but rarely do you ever go smaller for a box culvert or any drainage component,” replied Wood.

In closing, the presenter maintained that the DOT is doing a fine job of planning ahead in reference to three future bill packages impacting the I-26, U.S. Highway 176 and South Carolina Highway 187.

Other details communicated by Wood pertaining the 1-26 widening and new interchange/bridge construction included a Nov. 30, 2026 contract completion date, as Banks Construction of North Charleston has been hired to handle the labor-and-materials aspect of the project.

“In summary, I’d just like to say that the I-26, mile marker 187 is a major component to the South Carolina transportation planning, which supports the local growth by improving the essential freight corridor essentially out of Charleston with all the port activities and with Walmart, Volvo and other companies moving in,” concluded the married father of three, who has previously managed over $200 million of construction in the Lowcountry.

Nearly half of home buyers in Berkeley County’s megadevelopments are from out of state

If it seems like parts of Berkeley County are being invaded by new out-of-state residents, you’re only halfway wrong — or correct.Almost half of new home buyers in Nexton and Carnes Crossroads — two of the most flocked-to master-planned communities in the Charleston region — are coming from places beyond South Carolina’s borders.In 2021, this group represented 47 percent of purchasers in Nexton and Carnes Crossroads. The other 53 percent came from within the Palmetto State, with 70 percent of those...

If it seems like parts of Berkeley County are being invaded by new out-of-state residents, you’re only halfway wrong — or correct.

Almost half of new home buyers in Nexton and Carnes Crossroads — two of the most flocked-to master-planned communities in the Charleston region — are coming from places beyond South Carolina’s borders.

In 2021, this group represented 47 percent of purchasers in Nexton and Carnes Crossroads. The other 53 percent came from within the Palmetto State, with 70 percent of those originating from inside the Charleston area, according to data provided by the developers.

“It’s been that way from the beginning,” said Nexton spokeswoman Cassie Cataline. “Since we’ve opened, the percentage has been about the same – 50-to-60 percent of the buyers have come from South Carolina and the rest from out-of-state. I don’t know if it’s a price-point thing or what.”

The 5,000-acre Nexton property is expected to put about 7,000 homes on the ground with a population of about 17,500 at full buildout over the next decade. Over roughly the same period, the nearby 2,300-acre Carnes Crossroads development could have about 4,500 homes with more than 11,000 residents.

A common misconception among Lowcountry residents is that the majority of buyers are moving from either the Northeast corridor or Ohio.

“No, we are not being invaded by people from Ohio,” Cataline said with a chuckle.

Last year, the largest percentage of out-of-state buyers in Nexton moved in from North Carolina and Georgia, specifically from the Charlotte and Atlanta metropolitan areas.

The other top referring states were New York, Virginia and Pennsylvania as those buyers were made up primarily of retirees.

“It’s not just the home itself anymore that’s important,” said Roni Haskell, a realtor with Keller Williams, who has sold more than two dozen homes in the two mixed-use mega-developments. “Yes, the home and affordability are huge factors, but it’s also the neighborhoods now. More and more buyers are looking for the master-planned communities — what I’d call macro-communities — like Nexton and Carnes Crossroads.

“They don’t want to feel isolated; they want to feel like they are in the heart of things, but they don’t want have to go too far to get that lifestyle,” she added. “They want a community feel.”

Nearly 85 percent of buyers in Nexton were made up of either baby boomers or millennials, although there was a smaller percentage of younger buyers as well.

• 49 percent are boomers.

• 36 percent are millennials.

• 15 percent are gen-Xers.

Caroline Ayres, 29, grew up in the Hilton Head Island area and had been living in an apartment in Summerville with husband, Lee, since 2018. The couple wanted more space and went in search of a home in early 2020, finally settling on a property in Nexton’s Brighton Park.

“Everything is super convenient and anything we need is about 10 minutes away,” she said. “Summerville is close by, and we can hop on the interstate and get to downtown Charleston pretty quickly. There’s a lot to do, some great restaurants, some great walking trails, there’s green space, we have a dog park near our house, so everything we need is right here. Those factors were huge for us when we were making our decision on where to buy.”

Tucker Martinelli, 61, was stationed at the Navy base in the early 1980s and was familiar with the area. When his wife, Elizabeth, retired as a school teacher in the summer of 2020, the Charlotte coupled moved to Carnes Crossroads.

“South Carolina is a retirement-friendly state with some of its tax policies,” Martinelli said. “I knew the Summerville-Goose Creek area pretty well. We looked at some homes in the Del Webb section of Nexton, but we fell in love with Carnes Crossroads. We’re still pretty active, so we like to get out and do things. That’s very important for us.”

Ayers said the mix of families in her Brighton Park neighborhood offers a unique generational blend.

“We have young families with kids and without kids and also some retired folks,” Ayers said. “I think it’s an interesting mix because most neighborhoods are normally either young families or an older crowd. Nexton offers a little bit of everything to every generation and that gives it a real community feel.”

Nexton sold 576 homes during 2021, giving the community a total of 2,000 sales. At the end of 2021, Nexton had 1,675 occupied homes and another 250 sold and under construction, with 1,258 completed apartments and 602 under development, Cataline said.

Carnes Crossroads had 480 completed homes in 2021 with 57 under construction, 42 in the planning and approval stage and 823 apartments on the ground, said spokeswoman Julie Dombrowski of DI Development Co., the development manager for the project.

Cane Bay, another large housing development in that area of Berkeley County, did not respond to a request for comment.

LIST: Lowcountry tree lightings and holiday parades

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Communities around the Lowcountry are gearing up for the holiday season with tree lightings and parades.Below, you’ll find a list of tree lighting and holiday parade events happening in December.CharlestonThe City of Charleston’s holiday parade will take place on December 4 at 3:00 p.m. The parade will commence on Broad Street at Rutledge Ave.The city will hold its tree lighting in Marion Square following the parade.The Holiday Parade of Boats will take plac...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Communities around the Lowcountry are gearing up for the holiday season with tree lightings and parades.

Below, you’ll find a list of tree lighting and holiday parade events happening in December.

Charleston

The City of Charleston’s holiday parade will take place on December 4 at 3:00 p.m. The parade will commence on Broad Street at Rutledge Ave.

The city will hold its tree lighting in Marion Square following the parade.

The Holiday Parade of Boats will take place on December 10 at Charleston Harbor. This event will happen from 5:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

The City of Charleston and Charleston Park Conservancy will gather at Colonial Lake on December 2 for the annual Light the Lake festival and tree lighting ceremony. The festival runs from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.

>> Learn more about the Light the Lake event: Click here.

Edisto

The 32nd Annual Edisto Christmas Parade will happen on December 10 at 2:00 p.m. The parade will start on Palmetto Blvd.

Folly Beach

The city of Folly Beach will gather to light its community Christmas tree at Folly River Park on November 25 at 7:00 p.m. The city’s 32nd Annual Christmas parade will be on December 10 at noon downtown.

Folly Beach Parks and Recreation will host Santa at Folly River Park on December 9. Children ages 12 and under are invited to meet Santa and shop for free Christmas gifts at the Santa Shack.

Georgetown

A tree lighting and lighted boat parade will happen in Georgetown on December 1. The event begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Georgetown Harborwalk and will run until 9:00 p.m.

Goose Creek

The City of Goose Creek will hold a tree lighting at the Municipal Center on December 2 from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The city’s Christmas parade will be on December 10. The parade will start on St. James Ave at 9:30 a.m.

Hanahan

Hanahan’s holiday parade will happen at 10 a.m. on December 3 and start from Hanahan High School. The tree lighting will be on December 2 at 6 p.m. at the Hanahan Amphitheater.

Moncks Corner

A Christmas tree lighting will happen on December 3 at Moncks Corner Recreation Complex at 6:00 p.m.

The annual Christmas parade will take place along Main Street on December 3 at 6:00 p.m.

The town’s ‘Celebrate the Season Holiday Festival’ will return for its 13th year. The festival will offer visits with Santa, a fire pit and marshmallow roasting, fun rides, and more! It happens December 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, and 17 from 6:00 p.m. until 9 p.m. The festival also features a lights driving tour at Old Santee Canal Park from November 25 through December 30.

Mount Pleasant

The Town of Mount Pleasant will see its annual Christmas Light Parade on December 11 along Coleman Blvd. The parade will begin at 5:30 p.m.

North Charleston

The City of North Charleston will hold its annual Christmas festival and parade on December 3. The event will happen at a new location at the Park Circle Traffic Circle from 4:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The Christmas parade will begin at 5:00 p.m. from Park Place South.

>> Learn more about the city’s holiday events: Click here.

Nexton

The Nexton community will have a golf cart parade on December 9 at 6:30 p.m., followed by a tree lighting at 7:00 p.m.

Summerville

The Town of Summerville and Summerville DREAM will hold a Christmas parade on December 11. The parade will start in Hutchinson Square at 2:00 p.m.

Walterboro

The City of Walterboro will host its community Christmas Parade on December 4 at 6:30 p.m. The parade will start at the Colleton Civic Center in downtown Walterboro.

Did we miss something? Send us information by clicking here.

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