Criminal Defense Attorney in Nexton, SC

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Fighting For You

When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients' cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring - a criminal defense attorney on Nexton, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

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Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

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Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in Nexton

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry's history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of Nexton's legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in Nexton, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system's ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in Nexton:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In Nexton, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney's role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime - a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Nexton, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Nexton, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Criminal Case Timeline In Nexton, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in Nexton, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone - most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of Nexton's criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in Nexton, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant's acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in Nexton, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Criminal Defense Attorney Nexton, SC

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a "count." During this phase, the State will gather a "grand jury" comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant's case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor's job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client's innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution's case.

Typically, a trial in Nexton includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State's Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense's Case
  • The State's Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in Nexton, SC

Office Vacancy Story Reversed In Some Smaller Southeastern Markets

There’s been no shortage of news over the past 30 months about office vacancies. In large gateway cities, office occupancies fell dramatically during the pandemic as staffs found they could work from home. Moreover, occupancies have remained stubbornly low, as employers and staff faced off over remote work.Though the weeks since Labor Day have seen a number of firms’ employees return to in-office mode, many corporate tenants in the nation’s biggest office markets are downsizing to considerably less space.But l...

There’s been no shortage of news over the past 30 months about office vacancies. In large gateway cities, office occupancies fell dramatically during the pandemic as staffs found they could work from home. Moreover, occupancies have remained stubbornly low, as employers and staff faced off over remote work.

Though the weeks since Labor Day have seen a number of firms’ employees return to in-office mode, many corporate tenants in the nation’s biggest office markets are downsizing to considerably less space.

But let’s pause before assuming the well-reported empty office is the ubiquitous norm. In an assortment of cities in the Southeast U.S., the opposite trend has taken hold. Developers and communities in Alabama and South Carolina, for instance, have noted growing tenant interest in office space, particularly in high-end office buildings.

No vacancies

The Jasper, a luxury 12-story, mixed-use structure in the historic downtown district of Charleston, S.C., features 75,000 square feet of AAA office space, as well as 25,000 square feet of first-floor retail space and 219 luxury multifamily units. All spaces in The Beach Company building, which touts its riverside geography, are currently filled.

The Range, situated within a designated Opportunity Zone in the western end of downtown Huntsville, Ala., not far from acclaimed restaurants, museums and parks, is a commercial office development offering three floors and 49,000 square feet of Class A commercial office space. Walking a fine line between big-city office environments and those with a small-town vibe, The Range offers pedestrian-friendly access to a variety of the Rocket City’s most popular dining, retail and entertainment options. That may be why it recently welcomed two new corporate tenants, Eyecare Partners and Bridgeworth Financial Services.

“People are leaving western and northeastern markets for small and mid-sized Southern cities like Huntsville,” says J.C. Darby, development manager at The Beach Company. “In the past decade Huntsville has become Alabama’s No. 1 city with the addition of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in investment from companies like Mazda, Toyota, The Boeing Company and Remington, all things The Beach Company looks for when scouting development sites.

“The Range is equidistant to the Interstate and all of Huntsville’s economic drivers, including the medical district, Cummings Research Park, NASA’s Space Flight Center and Redstone Arsenal. And we are predicting occupancy growth as a result of this, its walkability and the structure’s distinctive modern design.”

Near job hubs

Meanwhile, demand for office space sparked the development of two new office buildings in Nexton, a master-planned Summerville, S.C. community situated near the region’s top employers, including Volvo and Boeing. One, Atelier Downtown Nexton, offers two-story buildings featuring 2,500 to 18,000-square-foot spaces in a campus like setting where office structures are connected by walking trails.

Developed by Sharbell Development Corp. of New Jersey, the development is the latest within the live-work-play milieu of Downtown Nexton. “The Southeastern U.S. has appealed to Sharbell for years, especially South Carolina, due to its population and job growth, as well as its burgeoning diversity,” says the company’s Thomas Troy.

“Many companies are relocating to the South in search of lower costs and higher quality of life for employees, and our developments reflect that shift.”

Not to be outdone, Workplace at Nexton, a Class A office park within the community, offers 3,000 to 20,000-square-foot spaces, and connectivity to Nexton’s residential side. Residents can walk to Nexton Square’s shopping, hotel and other commercial businesses. Workplace at Nexton’s office spaces had all been claimed before construction was completed, and there’s been no attrition.

“Garden office space with minimal shared common spaces, private entrances and outdoor parks have become the gold standard for commercial leasing in the Charleston, S.C. region,” says Cassie Cataline, Nexton director of marketing.

“Leasing interest for Workplace at Nexton was so great we are developing additional commercial campuses, such as The Hub, to provide office, retail and medical space to address this demand.”

Family estate sues Berkeley County over traffic deaths on Nexton Parkway in 2020

SUMMERVILLE — The estate of a family who had three members die in a car accident on Nexton Parkway in 2020 has filed a lawsuit against Berkeley County.The three family members — Chad Freeman, 49, Andrew Freeman, 48, and Meredith Freeman, 74, — were killed Oct. 11, 2020 when a vehicle driven by Joshua Wensell collided with theirs on the parkway at the intersection of Brighton Park Boulevard.Wensell, 18 at the time, was charged with three counts of reckless homicide. His criminal case is pending.A lawsuit...

SUMMERVILLE — The estate of a family who had three members die in a car accident on Nexton Parkway in 2020 has filed a lawsuit against Berkeley County.

The three family members — Chad Freeman, 49, Andrew Freeman, 48, and Meredith Freeman, 74, — were killed Oct. 11, 2020 when a vehicle driven by Joshua Wensell collided with theirs on the parkway at the intersection of Brighton Park Boulevard.

Wensell, 18 at the time, was charged with three counts of reckless homicide. His criminal case is pending.

A lawsuit filed May 31 by the Freeman family estate contends unsafe driving conditions and negligence from the county led to the fatal crash. The suit is seeking unspecified actual and punitive damages.

“We contend that Berkeley County failed to maintain the intersection in a safe manner,” said Christopher C. Romeo, the attorney representing the Freeman family. “Visibility is a major factor for cars driving in either direction along Nexton Parkway. There are residents that have described it as a ‘pray and go’ intersection.”

County officials declined to comment on the lawsuit filed in state court.

Residents in the Del Webb Nexton neighborhood had complained to county officials for months about the intersection. At the time of the collision, the intersection did not have a traffic light and had palmetto trees and vegetation that obstructed the view of oncoming vehicles, Romeo said.

“If you are turning left from Nexton Parkway onto Brighton Park Boulevard, the trees and grass obstructed your view,” Romeo said. “The county knew there was a problem and did nothing about it. There was no traffic signal, no round-about to slow anyone down coming off of Interstate 26. It was only a matter of time before something like this was going to happen.”

The trees and vegetation were removed following the accident. A traffic light was installed at the intersection in March, almost 18 months after the incident.

“It shouldn’t have taken the death of three family members for the county to finally act,” Romeo said. “You can’t put aesthetics over people and safety. The foundation for all decisions should be safety first and that didn’t happen here.”

The suit claims the county failed to maintain “appropriate standards concerning roadway safety, traffic visibility, sight distances, and roadside landscaping” and that the county “had the opportunity to correct it” and did not.

State transportation officials have reported more than 25 accidents at the intersection since 2018.

“Obviously, this is a very important case for the family, but we are also doing this to help prevent future accidents like this one,” Romeo said. “There are intersections like this all across the Lowcountry. We hope by bringing this to light that government and private entities will correct these issues now instead of waiting until three family members die.”

Romeo said a second lawsuit will be filed against “private companies” in the coming months.

Del Webb Nexton and the nearby Carnes Crossroads and Cane Bay neighborhoods are all a part of what is referred to as the megadevelopment where around 30,000 homes are expected to be built. A more than 900-acre Summerville development is also slated to be built across from Nexton Parkway.

It will run along I-26, Drop Off Drive and Linda Way. Though the new development won’t connect to the Nexton community, it is expected to bring hundreds of cars and residents to the area.

Push for more safety measures along Nexton Parkway continue after addition of stoplight

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCIV) — It’s been three weeks since a stoplight at a busy intersection at Nexton Parkway and Brighton Park Boulevard has been put up. But now, community members are pushing for more safety measures to be installed.Residents told ABC News 4's Sean Mahoney that the addition of the stoplight was a minor victory in a near decade-long battle to help improve overall safety along Nexton Parkway.It’s been three weeks since a stoplight at a busy intersection at Nexton Parkway and Brighton Park Boulev...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCIV) — It’s been three weeks since a stoplight at a busy intersection at Nexton Parkway and Brighton Park Boulevard has been put up. But now, community members are pushing for more safety measures to be installed.

Residents told ABC News 4's Sean Mahoney that the addition of the stoplight was a minor victory in a near decade-long battle to help improve overall safety along Nexton Parkway.

It’s been three weeks since a stoplight at a busy intersection at Nexton Parkway and Brighton Park Boulevard has been put up. But now, community members are pushing for more safety measures to be installed. (WCIV)

But they say the job isn’t finished, and while driving on the road may be safe now, it’s walking alongside it that has these residents concerned.

According to the South Carolina Highway Patrol nearly 6,000 people travel this stretch of Nexton Parkway, from the intersection down to Interstate 176, on any given day.

But for residents of the nearby Del Webb community, many of them travel next to the road.

“We're an active retirement community,” Del Webb resident Pat Heckert said. “Almost everybody has a bike, maybe a recumbent bike, or a regular bike. There are a lot of walkers and joggers.”

Currently, there is a bike/walkway path on the south side of Nexton Parkway, but the nearby retirement community is located on the north side.

This leaves more than 1,000 residents in the retirement community with a tough journey across the street.

“We're having to try to cross what we're now referring to as 'mini I-26' to try to access that major amenity,” Del Webb resident Joel Arenson said.

Residents of the community must navigate their way across a busy Nexton Parkway with no real avenue to get across besides quickly running to the other side of the street to reach the biker and pedestrian walkway path.

This has some of them avoiding doing it all together.

“My wife is definitely afraid to go across that parkway. So, you know, we wind up spending most of our time just riding around our Del Webb community,” Arenson said.

It’s important to note that there is currently a pedestrian walkway on the backside of the community, about a quarter mile down the road from the main entrance to the retirement community.

But residents say many don’t travel there and the traffic doesn't slow down.

“We're taking our lives in our hands to try to get across the parkway to enjoy it, either by walking or riding a bike or whatever,” Arenson said.

However, Arenson and company say they have a solution they believe can solve this problem.

“We're now advocating for a hiker-biker trail down our side of the parkway to a light so we can get across safely,” Heckert said.

Developers of the Del Webb community have told residents that they are planning to install a partial biker trail on the north side of the parkway once developments like Harris Teeter and Publix are built near the Brighton Park Boulevard intersection. But these residents say they want safety now.

“That will not be built and ready to take customers probably for at least two to three years, and in the meantime, you know, we're sacrificing our lives trying to get across the parkway,” Arenson said.

These community members hope that the progress doesn’t stop with the addition of the stoplight.

“We hope that the stoplight will be a first step in getting some safety installed and some further steps by the developer and the county for safety ahead,” Heckert said.

ABC News 4 reached out to Nexton community officials for comments on these concerns, but have not received a response.

The Dell Webb community is located less than a quarter mile down the road from the Brighton Park Boulevard intersection, where in October of 2020, a family of three was killed in a accident.

Residents like Arenson and Heckert say that the addition of the stoplight has already helped traffic flow and that they haven't seen any traffic accidents occur in the three weeks since it has been installed.

According to the South Carolina Highway Patrol, in 2022 alone, there have been three accidents at that intersection, one of which resulted in an injury.

Rotary rails over I-26 expansion roundabouts

Local engineer Chris Wood’s presentation of SCDOT’s $179 million-plus structural undertaking comprising the widening of I-26 and new SC 27 Interchange was no mundane nuts-and-bolts rundown.During his appearance at the Rotary Club of Summerville’s Nov. 2 meeting at the Nexton Hilton Garden Inn, organization members peppered the keynote speaker with doubts and concerns about two forthcoming roundabouts along the interchange site area near the Walmart Distribution Center in Ridgeville.Wood, a construction service...

Local engineer Chris Wood’s presentation of SCDOT’s $179 million-plus structural undertaking comprising the widening of I-26 and new SC 27 Interchange was no mundane nuts-and-bolts rundown.

During his appearance at the Rotary Club of Summerville’s Nov. 2 meeting at the Nexton Hilton Garden Inn, organization members peppered the keynote speaker with doubts and concerns about two forthcoming roundabouts along the interchange site area near the Walmart Distribution Center in Ridgeville.

Wood, a construction services project manager for the HDR design firm of North Charleston, led off the PowerPoint overview by describing the multilayered roadwork as a “substantial” and “challenging” project aimed at expanding seven miles of the I-26 from mile marker 187 to mile marker 193. Further, the one-time Naval officer walked the audience through a summary of an interchange construction — in the form of a 192-foot bridge — at Ridgeville Road to promote better traffic flow.

The mere mention of the soon-to-be-built interchange set off a series of questions from multiple club members in attendance, with one Rotarian pointedly asking Wood to list the advantages— if any — of two roundabouts and/or traffic signal/signage alternatives near the Walmart storage facility.

The civil engineer offered that the tight circular roundabout structures serve the purpose of adding a constant flow of traffic that — he estimated — works well with mid-level conditions of highway car travel.

“In other words, this isn’t high volume yet, so it keeps traffic moving under mid-level volumes of traffic,” detailed Wood, who reminded listeners that he is neither the design engineer nor a DOT authority who selected the roundabout method.

A fellow PE in the room questioned the functionality and purpose of roundabouts and the difficulties that they would present to regular drivers in light of the preponderance of large trucks that would traversing the make-shift, circular junction.

Wood explained that the roundabouts would be large enough to handle trucks coming from the Walmart site. He also mentioned how the curving of the circling structures would allow the trucks to navigate the roundabouts, while pointing out that the surrounding concrete would be sturdy enough to withstand the weight of the large vehicles.

Roundabouts are nothing new and have, in fact, been in existence for over 100 years, according to reports. However, their usage hasn’t always garnered public support due to instances where cars entering the traffic circle wind up frequently having the right-of-way over cars that are already in that same circle.

Other traditional cons concerning the viability of roundabouts stem from driver uncertainty about yielding, the overabundance of merge points, driver speed, motorists who try to cut the roundabout and cyclist/pedestrian shoulder lanes that are sometimes deemed as too narrow, potentially endangering those parties.

Wood’s description of the work continued with his narration of project elements regarding the construction of the S-32 Cypress Campground Road Bridge and the new I-26 bridge over Cypress Swamp.

The most formidable challenge of the DOT venture, he observed, is the installation of six box culverts (i.e. structural drainage that spans from one side of the road to the other).

“They’re substantial in size. You’re talking about this one here is a 287-foot, triple-barrel, 10′ x 9′ box culvert across the highway, so I mean, I hope it would be adequate to prevent situations like what you’re talking about,” said Wood in response to a Rotarian’s recollection of the addition of the 1-26 negatively impacting and/or impeding the backflow of area waterways.

“I would think that the new systems would be larger than the existing [ones] to handle these larger rain events. You make me want to check that when I go back, but rarely do you ever go smaller for a box culvert or any drainage component,” replied Wood.

In closing, the presenter maintained that the DOT is doing a fine job of planning ahead in reference to three future bill packages impacting the I-26, U.S. Highway 176 and South Carolina Highway 187.

Other details communicated by Wood pertaining the 1-26 widening and new interchange/bridge construction included a Nov. 30, 2026 contract completion date, as Banks Construction of North Charleston has been hired to handle the labor-and-materials aspect of the project.

“In summary, I’d just like to say that the I-26, mile marker 187 is a major component to the South Carolina transportation planning, which supports the local growth by improving the essential freight corridor essentially out of Charleston with all the port activities and with Walmart, Volvo and other companies moving in,” concluded the married father of three, who has previously managed over $200 million of construction in the Lowcountry.

MUSC to build hospital in Nexton

The master-planned Nexton community will soon become a medical destination for Berkeley County.Medical University of South Carolina has proposed a $130 million hospital within the Summerville community. The 128-patient bed facility will include four operating rooms, eight labor and delivery rooms, diagnostic testing and imaging, and emergency services, M...

The master-planned Nexton community will soon become a medical destination for Berkeley County.

Medical University of South Carolina has proposed a $130 million hospital within the Summerville community. The 128-patient bed facility will include four operating rooms, eight labor and delivery rooms, diagnostic testing and imaging, and emergency services, MUSC Health Chief Strategy Officer Sarah Bacik said.

“A large percentage of our current patients originate from Berkeley County, and this is going to really allow our patients to have access within our communities,” Bacik said. “It’s not a surprise to anyone that the growth has outpaced some of the infrastructure.”

MUSC has asked the state for approval to build the community hospital through a certificate of need.

The build is expected to take two and a half years.

Nexton’s Vice President of Operations Brent Gibadlo said a hospital offers a service to the surrounding areas and residents because health care options have become a growing priority for homebuyers.

“There are certain basic things that are important for everyone that don’t change,” he said. “Certainly good schools if people have children and then good health care options. So having a world-class hospital in close proximity is always a wonderful compliment to a community."

Downtown Charleston’s MUSC campus will remain the hub for the educational hospital, while the Nexton campus will book end it with satellite campuses and ambulatory services in between, Bacik said.

“We’re full downtown, and we need to make sure that we can continue to have access to those more acute patients,” Bacik said. “It’s really about getting the patients the right level of care at the right place.”

The need for a community hospital in Berkeley County is critical, said Dr. Dave Zaas, CEO of the Charleston division of MUSC. The hospital’s co-location in Nexton will help with the area’s continued growth.

“That is a lot of our strategy not just in tri-county but around the state,” he said. “Not only delivering the highest quality ... but more convenient and ideally at a lower cost. I think that drives our ambulatory growth as well as our statewide strategy.”

Gibadlo said Nexton is just starting to explore the possibilities with MUSC and its idea of community health care, of being more proactive and going out into the community to initiate health and wellness programs. Preventative care could then decrease the need for hospital visits.

“We’ve had conversations with MUSC on how to incorporate some of those programs into Nexton,” Gibadlo said. “That’s everything from community gardens to community fitness programs to even potential opportunities for some of the coordination between MUSC and some of the companies at Nexton.”

Other suggestions include incorporating companies’ health care programs through MUSC and creating wellness programs employees can participate in.

Bacik is already excited for both caregivers and patients because she believes the best care is delivered conveniently to patients, many of whom come from across the state.

“A lot of our patients and staff travel to the peninsula today to receive care or to care for our patients ... so if they could receive care 30 minutes closer, that’s a benefit for the communities as well,” Bacik said.

Gibadlo is going on 13 years at Nexton and said there is has another 13 or 14 years left in the business plan. He still remembers those early years, though, sitting in a Welcome Center trailer praying that builders and homebuyers would think outside the box.

Convincing people to give Nexton a chance was hard a decade ago given the location.

Over time, Gibadlo has found that if he pushes the envelope to create value, the innovation is well-received.

“I think the potential for Nexton is really evolving continuously. What we used to think was possible we’ve exceeded now. Maybe we can take it another step,” he said. “A hospital was something we only dreamed about 10 years ago. Now that’s happening.”

Nexton now receives calls almost daily from groups, retailers and home builders who want to create something exciting at the community. Gibadlo said the biggest challenge is prioritizing. If he reacts to every call, he risks losing focus of the long-term vision that Nexton is systematically moving through.

“At the same time, you have to be flexible enough that if you get a call, like from MUSC, you change track a little bit because that’s a great opportunity,” he said.

A community with a master plan allowed Gibadlo and his team to be deliberate about adding a hospital. They could look at the map of the 5,000 acres to find a plot that was accessible, wouldn’t disrupt homeowners with traffic and had surrounding space for businesses the hospital could bring in. Gibadlo believes they will come.

As an educational institution, MUSC’s research and development could lead to job opportunities and potential spin-off businesses, he said.

Together, Gibadlo and his team’s vision for Nexton stem from a love for the region. He knows, however, that with any growth, there will inevitably be challenges. The objective then is to figure out how to make those obstacles positive.

“We look at it and say hey, we can create this employment center in the Charleston region, take some of the pressure off downtown, 526, everyone commuting and bring some of the great things that people love about this region from a quality of life and bring them to another location that can spread them out a little bit,” he said. “Maybe we can play a small role in helping this region continue to be a great place to live. At the heart of it, that’s what motivates us every day.”

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