Criminal Defense Attorney in Mount Pleasant, SC

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Fighting For You

When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients' cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring - a criminal defense attorney on Mount Pleasant, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

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Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC

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Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in Mount Pleasant

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry's history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of Mount Pleasant's legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in Mount Pleasant, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system's ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in Mount Pleasant:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In Mount Pleasant, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney's role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime - a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Mount Pleasant, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Mount Pleasant, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC

Criminal Case Timeline In Mount Pleasant, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in Mount Pleasant, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone - most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of Mount Pleasant's criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in Mount Pleasant, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant's acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in Mount Pleasant, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Criminal Defense Attorney Mount Pleasant, SC

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a "count." During this phase, the State will gather a "grand jury" comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant's case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor's job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client's innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution's case.

Typically, a trial in Mount Pleasant includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State's Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense's Case
  • The State's Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Mount Pleasant voters asked to approve property tax increase for parks, recreation

MOUNT PLEASANT — It’s been more than a decade since the town bought more than 120 acres for a future park. Now, voters are being asked to approve a property tax increase to make that park a reality.Most of the $50 million Mount Pleasant would borrow, if the park tax referendum were to pass in a town-wide vote Nov. 8, would be used to develop the site on Rifle Range Road, with an estimated $10 million going to other recreation projects.The town’s property tax would rise by 10 percent to pay off the borrowed mon...

MOUNT PLEASANT — It’s been more than a decade since the town bought more than 120 acres for a future park. Now, voters are being asked to approve a property tax increase to make that park a reality.

Most of the $50 million Mount Pleasant would borrow, if the park tax referendum were to pass in a town-wide vote Nov. 8, would be used to develop the site on Rifle Range Road, with an estimated $10 million going to other recreation projects.

The town’s property tax would rise by 10 percent to pay off the borrowed money plus interest. When the debt is paid off after 15 years the extra tax would end, according to advocates, although the referendum does not mention a time limit.

The impact on total property tax bills would be much smaller than a 10 percent increase because the town accounts for just a portion of those annual bills and the school district gets the largest share.

Most Town Council members — seven of nine — supported putting the referendum on the ballot and some are actively working to see it passed.

“We’re trying to create something for this generation and the next,” Councilman John Iacofano said. “I think it’s going to be tight, but I think it’s going to pass.”

Mayor Will Haynie and Councilwoman Brenda Corley are opposed.

“In bad economic times, not everyone can afford this,” said Haynie. “I’m out there letting people know why they ought to vote no.”

He said the town should rely on impact fees that apply to new home construction to fund growth-related needs for recreation projects. The most those fees could raise would be $1.68 million yearly by Haynie’s estimate and wouldn’t allow the town to borrow tens of millions to put plans in action.

“If the referendum is successful, we can begin building immediately,” Iacofano and Councilwoman G.M. Whitley wrote, urging support for the ballot question.

Plans for the park site include four large playing fields, tennis and pickleball courts, playgrounds, fishing piers, a disc golf course, trails, volleyball and basketball courts, a performance space and a multipurpose building.

“It will be the Central Park of Mount Pleasant,” then-Mayor Billy Swails said in 2010, when the town and county agreed to spend $20 million to buy the land.

Iacofano said that if the town had raised its property tax then, the town would have a park by now.

“I don’t know that people truly understand how inexpensive our taxes are in Mount Pleasant, considering the services received,” he said.

The referendum would put an estimated $40 million toward building the park. The remaining 20 percent of the money would go to renovations of the Park West pool building, improvements at the Mugsy Kerr tennis complex on Whipple Road, and bike/pedestrian trails. If any money is left, the town could use that to fund green space preservation.

So, just how much would taxes increase if the referendum were to pass?

The impact on any particular taxpayer would vary, because the property tax is based on the assessed value of real estate and vehicles. Even next-door homeowners with identical houses could see very different results, depending when they purchased their homes and what vehicles sit in the driveways.

For an owner-occupant with a house valued at $500,000 for tax purposes, passage of the referendum would mean an extra $80, plus the added tax on any vehicles.

If that same house were a rental property, the extra tax would be $120, because commercial properties are taxed at a 50 percent higher rate. Large businesses would see the greatest tax difference.

The last time the town put a recreation referendum on the ballot, in 2015, it was narrowly defeated. The town has planned to develop the park site since it was purchased in 2010, but has not developed a funding plan.

The town’s property is half the 245-acre site that was jointly purchased with Charleston County Parks and Recreation. The town’s portion is planned for more active recreation, with playing fields, pickleball courts and other amenities.

Some people, including Corley, have come to see the town-owned land as green space that should not be developed. In voting against holding a referendum, Corley expressed concern about the impact on wildlife.

Recreation advocates argue that the town has far too few playing fields to handle the current demand, and say most of the jointly owned site would remain undeveloped in any case.

A group called Vote for Parks — Mount Pleasant has put up a website (voteparks.org) advocating for the referendum. There appears to be no organized opposition, but a big hurdle for supporters will be overcoming the history of town voters opposing property tax increases, including the 2015 park referendum and the 2020 Charleston County affordable housing referendum.

Daniel Brownstein, who ran unsuccessfully for a seat in the statehouse against Joe Bustos in 2020, is representing that group. He said it’s being funded by “local citizens who want to ensure that children and adults have adequate parks and recreational amenities.”

Several Tigers make All-ODAC football team

Hampden-Sydney College (H-SC) placed nine student-athletes on the 2022 All-Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC) Football Teams, including four First Team and five Second Team selections, while freshman wide receiver Mason Cunningham of Arlington was picked as the ODAC Rookie of the Year.Earning First Team All-ODAC honors were senior tight end David Byler of Virginia Beach, junior running back Melik Frost of Hardeeville, South Carolina, junior offensive lineman T.J. Minter of Chester and junior defensive back Will ...

Hampden-Sydney College (H-SC) placed nine student-athletes on the 2022 All-Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC) Football Teams, including four First Team and five Second Team selections, while freshman wide receiver Mason Cunningham of Arlington was picked as the ODAC Rookie of the Year.

Earning First Team All-ODAC honors were senior tight end David Byler of Virginia Beach, junior running back Melik Frost of Hardeeville, South Carolina, junior offensive lineman T.J. Minter of Chester and junior defensive back Will Pickren of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.

Garnering Second Team All-ODAC accolades were Cunningham, as an all-purpose back, fifth-year quarterback Tanner Bernard of Lynchburg, sophomore wide receiver Austin Fernandez of Warrenton, fifth-year defensive lineman Michael Harris of Ashland and junior defensive back James-Ryan Salvi of Troutville.

Mason Cunningham started seven of 10 games and had 59 receptions for 660 receiving yards and six touchdowns. He ranks second in the ODAC in receptions and receptions per game (5.9), is tied for fourth in receiving touchdowns, and tied for fifth in receiving yards and receiving yards per game (66.0). Mason averaged 5.4 yards on eight punt returns with a long return of 10 yards.

David Byler started all 10 games and had 49 receptions for 547 receiving yards and six touchdowns. He ranks fourth in the ODAC in receptions (47), tied for fourth in receiving touchdowns, fifth in receptions per game (4.9), and seventh in receiving yards and receiving yards per game (54.7). David established a new season record for receptions by a tight end at H-SC with his 49 receptions, and completed his H-SC career with 59 career receptions for 640 yards and seven touchdowns-starting 12 of 27 career games.

Melik Frost started all 10 games and rushed for 943 yards on 201 carries (4.7) and 12 touchdowns, adding 236 yards receiving on 26 receptions and one receiving touchdown. He leads the ODAC in rushing yards and rushing yards per game (94.3), and ranks second in all-purpose yards (1,179), all-purpose yards per game (117.9), rushing touchdowns and total touchdowns (13).

T.J. Minter started all 10 games, anchoring the offensive line from his left tackle position as the Tigers accounted for 4,275 yards of total offense (427.5), including 1,139 yards rushing (113.9) and 3,136 yards passing (313.6) with 44 touchdowns. Minter is now a two-time All-ODAC First Team selection.

Will Pickren started all 10 games at safety and had 123 total tackles, including 48 solo and 75 assisted, 5.0 tackles for loss, two interceptions, three pass breakups, one forced fumble, one quarterback hurry and one blocked PAT kick. He leads the ODAC in total tackles and tackles per game, and is tied for sixth in interceptions. He ranks third in Division III in total tackles and tackles per game. Will is a now a three-time All-ODAC First Team selection.

Tanner Bernard, a second-year team captain, started all eight games he played and passed for 2,486 yards (204-311, 65.6%) and 21 touchdowns with four interceptions. He leads the ODAC in passing yards per game (310.8), completions per game (25.5) and total offense (310.2), ranks second in passing yards, passing touchdowns, completion percentage (65.6), passing efficiency (152.52) and passing yards per attempt (8.0), and fourth in passing yards per completion (12.2). He ranks fourth in Division III in passing yards per game and completions per game and eighth in total offense. Tanner is now a three-time All-ODAC selection (First Team in 2021), and completed his H-SC career with 5,965 yards passing and 44 touchdowns, adding 84 yards rushing and five touchdowns for 6,049 yards of total offense-starting 23 of 23 career games.

Austin Fernandez started all 10 games and had 60 receptions for 775 receiving yards and six touchdowns. He leads the ODAC in receptions and receptions per game, is third in receiving yards and receiving yards per game (77.5), and is tied for fourth in receiving touchdowns.

Michael Harris, a team captain, started all nine games he played and had 29 total tackles, including 12 solo and 17 assisted, three tackles for loss, one sack, one quarterback hurry and one blocked PAT kick. Michael is a now a two-time All-ODAC selection, and completed his H-SC career with 101 career tackles, including 36 solo and 65 assisted, nine tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks, one quarterback hurry and one blocked PAT kick-starting 29 of 33 career games.

James-Ryan Salvi started all 10 games at safety and had 98 total tackles, including 39 solo and 59 assisted, 0.5 tackles for loss, eight pass breakups and one fumble recovery. He ranks third in the ODAC in total tackles and tackles per game, and is tied for fourth in pass breakups.

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Vote on Recreation Referendum approaches, residents divided on tax increase

Mount Pleasant voters will be faced with a choice this November. The Town’s Recreation Referendum will appear on the ballot on Nov. 8. The referendum, if passed, will fund a variety of projects, with a majority of the funds — nearly $40 million — going toward Rifle Range Road Park.Town Council voted 7-2 this summer to allow residents to vote on the referendum on Election Day. Mayor Will Haynie and Councilwoman Brenda Corley voted against the referendum in July. There was much discussion between council members on wha...

Mount Pleasant voters will be faced with a choice this November. The Town’s Recreation Referendum will appear on the ballot on Nov. 8. The referendum, if passed, will fund a variety of projects, with a majority of the funds — nearly $40 million — going toward Rifle Range Road Park.

Town Council voted 7-2 this summer to allow residents to vote on the referendum on Election Day. Mayor Will Haynie and Councilwoman Brenda Corley voted against the referendum in July. There was much discussion between council members on what projects the $50 million referendum should fund.

In the end, it was decided that the referendum will fund the development of Rifle Range Road Park, which will see rectangular fields, a performance area, a gymnasium and pickleball courts on the 245-acre property. Over 150 acres of the property will be preserved for passive park use, as well.

The remaining funds will go towards the Park West indoor pool renovation, the expansion of the Mugsy Kerr Tennis Complex on Whipple Road and the formation of Mount Pleasant Way paths. The referendum will also fund the acquisition and preservation of land and greenspace and the operation and maintenance of the new facilities.

However, some residents question if Mount Pleasant even needs another park.

A Facebook group called “Save the Park Mt. Pleasant” was created earlier this year and includes public posts from residents who are ready to vote against the referendum. Many users share the sentiment that Rifle Range Road Park should remain a greenspace, and feel that the current recreational amenities are underutilized as is.

“The referendum is overkill both literally and figuratively. If facilities are truly needed, wait until the Town has the funding and build elsewhere,” Mount Pleasant resident Therese Kristiansen said. “Residents have documented fields, courts and program rooms sitting empty. There is no data to warrant the referendum.”

Daniel Brownstein began Vote for Parks, a citizen’s group that advocates for the passage of the referendum. Brownstein is a father of two young children and said that he feels the referendum will give the community more recreational opportunities beyond the ones that currently exist.

“I have a 10-year-old son and a 9-year-old daughter and between them, they’ve pretty much played every sport and done every recreational activity imaginable,” Brownstein said. “They’re very active and so I’ve always been passionate about making sure that kids have the activities and the athletics that they need to develop into successful, productive adults.”

The last park constructed in Mount Pleasant was Carolina Park, a multi-phase recreational complex that first opened in 2011. Brownstein hopes that adding a new park in town will allow the recreation department to accommodate more activities for more families.

“I know that from my experience with youth sports and recreational programs that there really is a stress on our existing facilities. There’s not enough of them,” Brownstein said. “This problem is only going to get worse as Mount Pleasant grows unless we build or advocate for facilities required for the population.”

If passed, residents would pay an increased property tax for up to 15 years. For a tax-assessed home with an appraised value of $500,000, this would be roughly $80 a year. Perry Rourk, who serves on the Town’s Recreation Advisory Commission, said that the money the town would receive from the referendum would be guaranteed to fund the projects listed.

“I know most people look at it as a tax increase, but at least as a tax increase it’s guaranteed where the money is going to be used and it’s guaranteed to automatically end at the end of the bond term,” Rourk said.

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Charleston company helping local restaurants divert food waste from the landfill

A Charleston-area business is helping local restaurants divert waste from South Carolina landfills.Though the process is fairly straightforward, less than 25 restaurants are utilizing the services of SMART Recycling, which also counts the Charleston County School District, Horry County Schools, University of South Carolina, College of Charleston, The Citadel and the city of Charleston among its nearly 60 member users.Founded in 2014 by Gary Bilbro, ...

A Charleston-area business is helping local restaurants divert waste from South Carolina landfills.

Though the process is fairly straightforward, less than 25 restaurants are utilizing the services of SMART Recycling, which also counts the Charleston County School District, Horry County Schools, University of South Carolina, College of Charleston, The Citadel and the city of Charleston among its nearly 60 member users.

Founded in 2014 by Gary Bilbro, SMART Recycling collects food waste from its clients and delivers it to a composting facility in the three areas the company serves: Charleston, Columbia and Horry County.

Charleston restaurants using the 8-year-old company — Husk, Obstinate Daughter and Melfi’s, among others — are making a difference.

Bohemian Bull owner Chad Biel said SMART Recycling helps his James Island bar and restaurant divert about 2 tons of waste from the landfill every month.

“We really did it because it felt like it was the right thing to do,” Biel said. “Understanding what food waste does in a landfill is a big piece of it.”

Food waste is the largest category of material that ends up in municipal landfills, according to the U.S Environmental Protection Agency. Once in the landfill, it emits methane, a powerful greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. Municipal solid waste landfills are the third-largest source of human-related methane emissions in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

“When food waste is buried like that, it doesn’t have access to oxygen,” said SMART Recycling accounting manager Meghan McGill. “And when it doesn’t have access to oxygen, it just rots.”

Composting facilities break down the waste organically, producing a nutrient-rich soil supplement, McGill said.

“It creates this environment where the healthy bacteria can break that down and turn it into compost,” she said.

SMART is an acronym for Specialized, Measurable, Adaptable, Realistic and Timely. Before working with a restaurant or organization, SMART Recycling conducts a site assessment, decides the number of bins needed and trains the organization’s employees along the way.

The for-profit company supplies 64-gallon carts to restaurants, picking them up and hauling to the nearest composting facility. After they are emptied, the carts are pressure-washed and returned to the restaurant.

The service starts at $125 per month.

“It is a cost, so ideally they’re caring about the environment. A lot of the fine-dining restaurants, they have a larger profit margin for this type of thing,” McGill said. “We certainly want to see it grow.”

SMART Recycling has saved Bohemian Bull money, according to Biel, by allowing him to scale back his garbage pickup service.

Biel estimates he was spending $400 to $500 per month on garbage pickup before teaming up with SMART Recycling seven years ago.

The $200 a month SMART Recycling now costs him is offset by cutting in half the cost of his garbage services.

Biel is preparing to franchise Bohemian Bull, with plans to add locations in Mount Pleasant, Greenville, Dallas and Jacksonville, Fla. He plans to utilize SMART Recycling at the South Carolina locations, but Biel will have to find an alternative in other states where the company focuses its operations.

Signed, sealed, delivered: Mount Pleasant athletes participate in Signing Day

Student athletes at Wando, Lucy Beckham, Bishop England and Oceanside Collegiate Academy, surrounded by family, friends and coaches, participated in Early National Signing Day on Nov. 9. Thirty-three East Cooper high school seniors signed their letters of intent to begin their journey into college athletics.Wando High School had nine student athletes sign their letters of intent to play college sports.“We’re very excited to have nine seniors who are getting the opportunity to compete at the collegiate level. This is...

Student athletes at Wando, Lucy Beckham, Bishop England and Oceanside Collegiate Academy, surrounded by family, friends and coaches, participated in Early National Signing Day on Nov. 9. Thirty-three East Cooper high school seniors signed their letters of intent to begin their journey into college athletics.

Wando High School had nine student athletes sign their letters of intent to play college sports.

“We’re very excited to have nine seniors who are getting the opportunity to compete at the collegiate level. This is a testament to their hard work and effort and their involvement with our athletic programs and, of course, the programs that they’re involved with all year round,” said Wando Athletic Director Mark Buchman.

Baseball

Ryder Manale — Coastal Carolina University

Boys Lacrosse

Garrett Mayer — Rhodes College

Girls Lacrosse

Kelsey Bennett — Florida Southern University

Delaney Harrison — Newberry College

Softball

Alyssa Boris — Brevard College

Samantha Bumgarner — Lander University

Ava Crawford — Southern Wesleyan University

Caroline Holmes — Coker University

Track and Field

Julia Galbally — Clemson University

Lucy Beckham celebrated its first signing day in the school’s history. Five seniors signed their letters of intent at a large ceremony in the school’s gym, including Lacrosse player Anne Edens, who is the first Beckham athlete to commit to a Division I school.

“Athletes, we’re super proud of you. We’re proud of all your hard work and what you’ve done for Lucy Beckham in setting the tone for the rest of the student body,” Lucy Beckham Athletic Director Scott McInnes said to the athletes. “This place is a very special place for us. We’re about love. We truly love our athletes.”

Boys Lacrosse

Charlie Broucqsault — Lander University

Conner Coombs — Wingate University

Baker Hollingsworth — Limestone College

Girls Lacrosse

Anne Edens — Villanova University

Girls Tennis

Piper Charney — University of Michigan

Five seniors at Bishop England High School signed their letters of intent on Nov. 9.

“Bishop England is very proud of our student-athletics who are getting a chance to further their athletic career at the next level. These athletes have shown that they have what it takes to be successful on and out the field of play. As [athletic director], I am proud of their achievements and the hard work of their coaches and support of their parents,” said Bishop England Athletic Director Paul Runey.

Boys Lacrosse

Riley Finlayson — Centre College

Girls Lacrosse

Evelyn Kitchin — Coastal Carolina University

Leslie Wysong — Merchant Marine Academy

Golf

Sam McMillan — Anderson University

Luke Walmat — College of William and Mary

Oceanside Collegiate Academy celebrated 13 student athletes who committed to playing their respective sports at colleges and across the nation.

“We are very proud of these 13 student athletes that have worked so hard in the classroom and on the field, court, pool to achieve the lofty goal of continuing to play their sport at the collegiate level,” Oceanside Athletic Director Mark Meyer said in a statement.

Baseball

Andrew Bowers — Coastal Carolina University

Chase Jarnagin — College of Charleston

Cameron Sebuck — Coastal Carolina University

Jackson Sobel — Georgia Tech

Tagger Tyson — University of Louisville

Girls Lacrosse

Maddy Mayer — Winthrop University

Sage Adams — Lynn University

Alexis Manini — West Virginia Wesleyan College

Golf

William Lutz — Winthrop University

Waymon Thomas — College of Charleston

Rowing

Caroline Hill — Clemson University

Swim

Landon Duffie — Converse College

Tennis

Garrett Brooker — St. Michael’s College

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