Criminal Defense Attorney in Kiawah Island, SC

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Fighting For You

When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients’ cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring – a criminal defense attorney on Kiawah Island, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

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Richard Waring

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in Kiawah Island

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry’s history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of Kiawah Island’s legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in Kiawah Island, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system’s ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in Kiawah Island:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense
Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In Kiawah Island, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In Kiawah Island, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney’s role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime – a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Kiawah Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Kiawah Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Knowing Your Rights
Knowing Your Rights

Criminal Case Timeline In Kiawah Island, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in Kiawah Island, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone – most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of Kiawah Island’s criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Arrest And Investigation

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Initial Bond Setting

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in Kiawah Island, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Preliminary Hearing

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Initial Appearance

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Plea Offers

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant’s acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Discovery

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in Kiawah Island, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Indictment

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a “count.” During this phase, the State will gather a “grand jury” comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant’s case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor’s job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client’s innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution’s case.

Typically, a trial in Kiawah Island includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State’s Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense’s Case
  • The State’s Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in Kiawah Island

Rex at the Royal is a nod to the Great Migration but misses some Southern basics

Cornbread is part of the conversation at Rex at the Royal.It’s the first thing you’ll taste when you settle into one of the cushy teal booths that anchor this dramatic new dining room on South Street where the historic Royal Theater once stood. It beckons warm from inside the folds of purple linen, a scoop of honeyed butter at the ready. And when I cracked one open, its earthy steam mingling with the anise kiss of a Sazerac in my other hand, I was fully primed for a Southern journey.There would be creamy crocks of s...

Cornbread is part of the conversation at Rex at the Royal.

It’s the first thing you’ll taste when you settle into one of the cushy teal booths that anchor this dramatic new dining room on South Street where the historic Royal Theater once stood. It beckons warm from inside the folds of purple linen, a scoop of honeyed butter at the ready. And when I cracked one open, its earthy steam mingling with the anise kiss of a Sazerac in my other hand, I was fully primed for a Southern journey.

There would be creamy crocks of she-crab soup, juicy pork chops over zesty collards, more great cocktails, and a (gluten-free!) banana pudding cheesecake to follow. But first, those corn muffins...

I appreciated the balance of sweetness and fluff in its crumb, as well as its deep rustic corn savor. But cornbread expectations are different depending on which side of the Mason-Dixon Line you happen to be eating. And this particular recipe has followed its own telling journey of modifications in the first few months of Rex at the Royal, opened in October by Jill Weber and Evan Malone of Sojourn Philly, who also own Sor Ynez, Cafe Ynez and Jet Wine Bar.

Rex chef Aaron Paik, who previously worked at the Sanctuary Hotel in Kiawah Island, S.C., initially made it with pure Jimmy Red, a revived heirloom grain from Edisto Island, S.C., cultivated by Marsh Hen Mills that speaks to the Lowcountry traditions Rex at the Royal evokes. But that early version was dry and less sweet, a profile true to regional preference, says Paik.

That these muffins have since been modified with some yellow corn and more sugar to sweeten them into something Philadelphians might be more accustomed to is simply part of the conversation at the heart of this project. Who gets to carry forth the legacy of Southern food as it evolves?

Weber, also an archaeologist, wanted to create a tribute to the Southern Black chefs who moved to Philadelphia a century ago during the Great Migration and adapted their foodways (including many from the Lowcountry coasts of South Carolina and Georgia) to the Mid-Atlantic. Still, Rex at the Royal does not aim solely to be a Southern restaurant, and the food should reflect its regional transformations.

It’s a fascinating concept and compelling that it would come to life on the site of the historically significant Royal Theater. Opened in 1920 as a first-run cinema operated for and by Black Americans, the Royal became a cultural hub that later hosted live performances from Bessie Smith, Cab Calloway, and Fats Waller. The theater unfortunately languished vacant for nearly half a century between when it closed in 1970 and when it was ultimately demolished in 2017 to make way for the apartments and houses built behind the new restaurant.

To see the lights finally blink on and the eager crowds flow into this beauty behind the Royal’s preserved facade after several years of construction should be cause for celebration on this stretch of South Street in Graduate Hospital.

Weber and Malone, who previously operated the much smaller Rex 1516 just a few doors east, have stepped up their game with this massive new 250-seat space, whose chandelier-hung ceiling, walnut-paneled walls, and mezzanine lounge accessed by a sweeping staircase exude a rare special-occasion grandeur. A retail bottle shop and cafe on the side, with imminent plans for all-day service (breakfast biscuits, sparkling wines by the glass with raw bar oyster), adds a more accessible, casual dynamic to the operation.

There’s genuine hospitality from the diverse staff led by general manager Brian Jackson. And despite its size, this space designed by Philadelphia’s Gabrielle Canno still exudes personality and warmth, from the cozy circular booths that ring the main dining room to the long amazonite bar that energizes the space near the entrance, where crowds linger over well-made cocktails that range from classic Remy-spiked Sidecars to a festively rummy Hurricane.

There’s a list of worthwhile wines by the glass with a natural bent one might expect from Weber (try the Kivelstadt KC Labs Zinfandel). But there’s also a repertoire of original cocktails from lead bartender Joshua Scheid and director of operations Nick Baitzel created with food in mind, like the carrot tequila brew called Por Dio, whose turmeric spice echoes the vegetarian accra fritter burger made from mashed black-eyed peas, or the vivid orange leche de tigre that brightens the daily crudo scattered with benne seeds and tangy chowchow.

All those elements have contributed to meals I’ve enjoyed on the whole as a dining experience. But whether Rex at the Royal has the culinary vision to really achieve its lofty historical tribute mission is an open question. Weber and Malone fell into running a Southern-themed menu at the original Rex because their opening chef was from Alabama. And though Rex cultivated a number of specialties I appreciated — a flaky crawfish pot pie that remains on this menu, for example — I valued the original more as a destination for upscale burgers and cocktails than a haven of studious Southern cooking.

With a more deliberate focus here on Lowcountry influences and their Philadelphia connections, Weber and corporate culinary director Lucio Palazzo turned to former Geechee Girl Rice Cafe chef Valerie Erwin for consulting help. Erwin provided an early menu with standards like Hoppin’ John (done well here) and has since added recent tweaks like the curried Country Captain take on seared scallops. But Erwin had no interest, at 69, in running such a large restaurant. And her efforts to help them in their search for a younger Black Philly chef never quite landed the right fit.

A wider national search connected them with Paik, 33, a Brooklyn native of Afro-Dominican and Sicilian heritage whose experiences in the Florida Keys, as well as in Charleston, have added some welcome layers of lightness to Rex’s repertoire — especially that sunny crudo.

What does crudo have to do with Black chefs in Philadelphia a century ago? Not much. Neither is there any connection to the oyster stews, terrapin croquettes, and deviled crab detailed by Boothby’s chef Harry Franklyn Hall in his 1901 cookbook, 300 Ways to Cook and Serve Shellfish, which Weber has noted as an influence.

Rex at the Royal is now still polishing its Southern basics. And many of the appetizers trend on the heavy side, with a trio of fried starters that all feel in need of tweaks, from a tempura batter for the okra that was not especially crisp to fried green tomatoes that were shingled simply over a smudge of pimento cheese and seemed dry without a sauce. After a rich crock of she-crab soup, I was ready for a nap before we even got to the entrees.

That would have been a shame, because the shrimp and grits is outstanding. The pork chop was one of the most memorable I’ve had in months, tender and juicy over collards laced with smoked turkey ringed by a creamy grain mustard sauce.

I understand why people rave about the unconventional chicken and dumplings. The nicely grilled breast and smoked thigh are striking over the dark jus that pools around orange sweet potato gnocchi. It was certainly tasty. But I didn’t consider this cheffy deconstruction to be more satisfying than a well-executed version of the humble one-pot classic made with good ingredients. The bountiful Frogmore seafood stew would have been more my speed — had the kitchen not forgotten to add the fish of the day to the flavorful broth filled with shellfish and andouille.

Speaking of classics, Rex’s hefty ($22!) burger was also a surprise letdown. It towered over a brioche bun with its signature pimento cheese, crispy onions, and bacon. It was even perfectly medium-rare. But it had also rested so long before being served it arrived oddly juiceless.

These are the kind of small-but-impactful errors that can so easily be fixed, as long the conversation keeps rolling. The desserts are already solid, including the “milk and cookies” favorite from Rex 1516 that presents beignet-like fritters of cookie dough with oozing chocolate centers beside a RumChata shake, which I slurped until I hit bottom.

And so I have few doubts: Rex at the Royal is already a bright addition, bringing a vibrant dose of dining life and good flavors to a significant South Street address. And yet, I also can’t help feeling there’s a much larger step for this ambitious project to grasp. One day, if it manages to find the culinary talent to clearly crystallize its mission to become a modern homage to the Black Southern cooks who worked in Philadelphia a century ago, it could truly become important.

The Inquirer is not currently giving bell ratings to restaurants due to the pandemic.

Hours: Dinner Sunday through Thursday, 5-10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, until 11 p.m.; Sunday brunch, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Entrees, $19-$51.

Wheelchair accessible.

Street parking only.

Vaccine required.

Phil Mickelson defied the odds, and his age, to win an epic PGA Championship at Ocean Course

As he jetted home that night from Kiawah Island, Phil Mickelson popped the cork on a favorite vintage and tapped out a message on his phone.“Life is good,” Mickelson wrote, and it was so.Mickelson wrote the golf story of 2021 — and one of the best golf stories of all time — on the wind-swept Ocean Course on Kiawah Island in May. The 50-year-old, who was eight years removed from his last major title, became the oldest major champion in the sport’s history by winning the 103rd PGA Championship on Pet...

As he jetted home that night from Kiawah Island, Phil Mickelson popped the cork on a favorite vintage and tapped out a message on his phone.

“Life is good,” Mickelson wrote, and it was so.

Mickelson wrote the golf story of 2021 — and one of the best golf stories of all time — on the wind-swept Ocean Course on Kiawah Island in May. The 50-year-old, who was eight years removed from his last major title, became the oldest major champion in the sport’s history by winning the 103rd PGA Championship on Pete Dye’s punishing 7,800-yard layout.

The six-time major champion played it cool all week, moving at a deliberate pace with his brother Tim on the bag, and hiding his emotions behind a pair of ever-present shades.

But there was no playing it cool for the thousands of spectators at Kiawah. After a year in which PGA Tour events were sparsely attended due to COVID-19, the floodgates seemed to open at Kiawah, especially when Mickelson emerged as a contender against a field stuffed with younger stars.

Mickelson fans shouted their support during the week, climbing into trees to get a glimpse of their hero and following him in droves.

On championship Sunday, the dam broke as Mickelson marched up the 18th hole toward victory. He and playing partner Brooks Koepka were swallowed up by thousands of delirious fans who flooded the 18th fairway in a memorable scene.

“Certainly one of the moments I’ll cherish my entire life,” he said after the triumph. “I don’t know how to describe the feeling of excitement and fulfillment and accomplishment to do something of this magnitude, when very few people thought that I could.”

Mickelson’s unexpected victory thrilled his competitors, as well.

“It was like the Phil that I remember watching just when I turned pro and it was great to see,” said South African Louis Oosthuizen, who tied for second with Koepka. “I mean, what an achievement to win a major at 50 years old, and he deserves all of that today.”

Phil’s highest finish on the PGA Tour for the rest of 2021 was a tie for 17th, though he won three times on the Champions Tour. The week after the PGA Championship, he missed the cut.

“But, I won the PGA,” he said with a grin. “So …”

Johns Island welcomes California luxury hotel company

Charleston remains a popular destination, and the city’s expanding luxury hotel scene reflects that trend.California-based Auberge Resorts Collection plans to debut its first planned luxury hotel in South Carolina come 2024 in the form of The Dunlin, located within the Kiawah River master-planned community on Johns Island.In partnership with real estate developer ...

Charleston remains a popular destination, and the city’s expanding luxury hotel scene reflects that trend.

California-based Auberge Resorts Collection plans to debut its first planned luxury hotel in South Carolina come 2024 in the form of The Dunlin, located within the Kiawah River master-planned community on Johns Island.

In partnership with real estate developer The Beach Co. and private investment and management company McNair Interests, the project is set to have a January groundbreaking.

“The Dunlin will offer an unforgettable escape where guests can immerse themselves in the pristine natural setting of Johns Island and the culturally rich attractions of Charleston,” Auberge Chairman Dan Friedkin said in a statement.

The Dunlin property will include 72 cottage-style guest rooms and suites and 19 villas, as well as a main lodge and porch, great rooms and a library lounge. Amenities encompass a pool with cabanas, full-service spa, community farmstead, and access to the community’s Spring House riverfront swim and fitness facilities.

A riverfront restaurant with outdoor deck will also be available, as will two event spaces, including a 10,000-square-foot indoor-outdoor event hall.

“We are pleased to partner with Auberge Resorts Collection to create The Dunlin, which will be one of the most remarkable new resorts in the country,” Beach Co. CEO John Darby said. “Auberge has a terrific track record of creating the most unique hospitality experiences in the world, and this endeavor’s intimate setting will bring highly personalized service with a coastal experience inspired by the local environment.”

Built into the Kiawah River community, which puts emphasis in natural surrounding elements, The Dunlin will consist of 2,000 acres of land with 20 miles of riverfront nature trails and marshlands. Guests will be able to participate in nature excursions on the property, including fly fishing, crabbing and boating, as well as paddle boarding, hiking and biking.

Architect Robert Glazier was chosen to design the resort, and Amanda Lindroth of Lindroth Design will lead the interior design of the property.

Construction financing was provided by United Bank’s Charleston offices.

Auberge Resorts Collection has 22 other hotels and resorts across the globe, recently winning accolades from Travel & Leisure’s 2021 World’s Best and Conde Nast’s 2021 Readers’ Choice awards.

How South Carolina’s Kiawah Island strikes a balance between tourism and conservation

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier b...

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.

But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier beachfront homes. Kiawah Island has solidified itself as one of the most eco-friendly residential areas and tourist destinations in the United States, with conservation efforts dating back nearly half a century. Visitors are the beneficiaries of these extensive efforts, and the island is a rare example of how tourism and ecological concern can coexist.

In 1973, Kiawah Island established the Kiawah Turtle Patrol, an organization that tracks and protects the island’s native population of nesting loggerhead turtles. Soon after, Kiawah Investment, a Kuwaiti-owned company, purchased the island from heirs to a lumber company operator and, in 1975, conducted an environmental inventory of the island over the course of 16 months, studying natural habitats, wildlife and archaeological history, said Donna Windham, executive director of the Kiawah Conservancy.

The widespread inventory led to a master plan, which has since been enacted by the town of Kiawah, that combines environmental activism with tourism and leisure. “It was a whole new environment for them,” Windham said of the Kuwaiti effort. “They took it very seriously that this island was special.” Today, Windham said, the Kiawah Conservancy operates as a nonprofit land trust for the island, encouraging the protection of the environment by working in conjunction with landowners.

The conservancy, established in 1997, can hold land and issue easements. It has, to date, preserved “2,273 acres of Kiawah’s 10,000 acres,” according to the island’s website. In January 2000, Windham said, 152 acres of land known as Little Bear Island — a nesting destination for coastal birds such as the piping plover, peregrine falcon and osprey — were preserved by the Wetlands America Trust, part of the Ducks Unlimited nonprofit conservation group. The easement was updated in 2007 to include protection from the trust and the Kiawah Island Natural Habitat Conservancy.

As a traveler, you may see no concrete indication of the infrastructure that governs the island’s conservation. Yet the influence is everywhere, evident in the clamoring hermit crabs at the shoreline, the robust oyster beds that climb upward on the riverbanks, and the petite raccoons that scale trees at dusk in search of their next meal.

Close to the island’s Ocean Course, where a strip of cerulean is just visible beyond the marsh, a passerby might be privy to any number of natural encounters: alligators with snouts just visible in the pond water; hook-necked blue herons staring out into the palmettos; white-tailed deer bedding down beneath the drapery of Spanish moss. These moments, despite their frequency, arrive as a surprise in a place where golf clubs and impeccable architecture are the local currency.

But you’re more likely than not to encounter a wild animal during your visit, and that’s because Kiawah Island includes 3,000 acres of tidal salt marsh and 10 miles of shoreline, providing shelter for a variety of wildlife. According to town of Kiawah Wildlife Biologist Jim Jordan — his position was created in 2000 and, eight years later, Assistant Wildlife Biologist Aaron Given arrived — there are 315 species of birds, more than 30 species of mammals, more than 40 species of reptiles, more than 20 species of amphibians, and thousands of invertebrates that call the island home.

“It’s pretty unique,” Jordan said. It is, he said, “a functioning, intact ecosystem that’s working the way it would have worked if there were no houses there.”

One of the island’s most fascinating predators is the bobcat; the current bobcat population, Jordan said, is between 15 and 20. Four to six bobcats are collared by the biology team each year, so their movements can be tracked via GPS. “Visitors and residents can look at the tracking maps online and see where they’ve been,” he said.

Take a boat out onto the serene Kiawah River — you can book tours through the island’s sole resort, the Kiawah Island Golf Resort — and you’re bound to see a dolphin or two, gray fin slipping in and out of the water. These are the island’s bottlenose species, and they’re friendly, tracking vessels and providing the occasional show, flippers aflight. They also engage in a unique behavior known as “strand-feeding.”

“In a coordinated effort, they will basically force a school of fish or a school of shrimp up toward the bank,” Jordan said. “They beach themselves.” The western end of the island makes for good viewing of this behavior, although he warned that disrupting dolphins during their strand-feeds can be harmful. “It’s a learned behavior,” passed down from generation to generation, Jordan said. Should a strand-feed get interrupted, dolphins could abandon the behavior entirely, thus keeping future generations from learning how to eat in this location-specific manner.

The serenity experienced on this island oasis is thanks to more than just the work of the conservancy. At the Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort, for instance, an AAA five-diamond resort that was built in 2004, live, mature oak trees were transplanted to help promote the maintenance of the natural environment. “This really wasn’t required. It was just something that we did voluntarily, because we thought it was the right thing to do,” said Bryan Hunter, director of public relations for the Kiawah Island Golf Resort.

The resort, he said, places a premium on conservation efforts, encouraging guests to immerse themselves in the local environment through organized boat trips to other barrier islands, alligator safaris and dolphin-viewing excursions. Visitors can also tag along with the Turtle Patrol in the morning in search of hatching and migration patterns (although that program has been greatly restricted because of the coronavirus pandemic). Some may even get to assist hatchling turtles, Hunter said. Those who join the Turtle Patrol outings look for nests, take notes and record observations about the year’s hatch.

One conservation effort enforced by island residents — including hoteliers — is the Lights Out for Sea Turtles initiative, which requires that beach-illuminating lights be turned off in the evenings during loggerhead nesting season. As Jordan pointed out, artificial light confuses hatchling turtles, often accidentally guiding them away from the ocean.

Low light pollution, Hunter said, is “vital.” “The resort, along with the rest of the island, through town ordinance, makes sure that we really carefully monitor light pollution along the beach, so that it doesn’t disorient nesting sea turtles or hatching sea turtles,” he said.

As the sun descends at dusk, there is a vibration in the air. Is it the cicadas, on their 17-year cycle? Or maybe just a faraway flock of birds? Whatever the origin of the ambient noise, it calls to mind a soothing bedtime melody, the kind you might slip into as you wind down into sleep.

Potential travelers should take local and national public health directives regarding the pandemic into consideration before planning any trips. Travel health notice information can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's interactive map showing travel recommendations by destination and the CDC's travel health notice webpage.

This AAA five-diamond property has 255 guest rooms and suites, as well as multiple dining venues and direct beach access. Rooms from about $240.

Run by the Kiawah Island Golf Resort, this 1.5-hour boat excursion takes guests through creeks and marshes in search of the island’s native bottlenose dolphin population. $450 for up to six passengers.

Situated on the west end of the island, this ocean beach offers the only public access on Kiawah. Amenities include lifeguards, chair and umbrella rentals, restrooms, outdoor showers, a snack bar and a picnic area with grills. Parking $5 to $15 per vehicle.

Guests can ask resident wildlife biologists about the local ecology and visit with some of the native and nonnative species, such as diamondback terrapins and a 10-foot-long Burmese python. The center’s gift shop sells handcrafted items made by local artists. Free.

Walk or bike this one-mile scenic trail that extends over the marsh to a lookout tower. Part of the larger Kiawah Island bike trails system, which covers about 30 miles, this trail is suitable for all ages.

The Post’s best advice for living during the pandemic.

Health & Wellness: What to know before your vaccine appointment | Creative coping tips | What to do about Zoom fatigue

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Parenting: Guidance for vaccinated parents and unvaccinated kids | Preparing kids for “the return” | Pandemic decision fatigue

Food: Dinner in Minutes | Use the library as a valuable (and free) resource for cookbooks, kitchen tools and more

Arts & Entertainment: Ten TV shows with jaw-dropping twists | Give this folk rock duo 27 minutes. They’ll give you a musically heartbreaking world.

Home & Garden: Setting up a home workout space | How to help plants thrive in spring | Solutions for stains and scratches

Travel: Vaccines and summer travel — what families need to know | Take an overnight trip with your two-wheeled vehicle

Record year for annual MUSC fundraising event

The pandemic might be testing this country’s patience, but it certainly isn’t affecting its philanthropy. Over the holidays, a record $1,863,144 was raised for the Medical University of South Carolina as a part of Giving Tuesday.Created in 2012, Giving Tuesday started with a modest goal: do something good in the world. Since then, the Tuesday following Thanksgiving has grown into a global giving movement and the biggest giving day of the year in th...

The pandemic might be testing this country’s patience, but it certainly isn’t affecting its philanthropy. Over the holidays, a record $1,863,144 was raised for the Medical University of South Carolina as a part of Giving Tuesday.

Created in 2012, Giving Tuesday started with a modest goal: do something good in the world. Since then, the Tuesday following Thanksgiving has grown into a global giving movement and the biggest giving day of the year in the world. In 2017, MUSC got in on the action, and in that year and the subsequent four years, raised nearly $800,000. This year alone exceeded that cumulative total by more than $1 million.

“We are humbled by the generosity of this community,” said Kate Azizi, vice president for Institutional Advancement.

Even though MUSC is considered a state-funded organization, in reality, less than 4% of its annual budget comes from the government. That’s why donations are so critical. All the money raised on Giving Tuesday goes to the MUSC Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that has supported MUSC in its lifesaving mission since 1966. This time around, gifts ranged from $5 up to nearly $500,000.

More than half a million dollars of the donated money will go to scholarships for MUSC students. The MUSC Alumni Association donated $450,000, with a portion dedicated to enhancing diversity across MUSC’s entire student body. Donors inspired by the generosity of MUSC’s alumni gave an additional $80,000 to a variety of scholarships at MUSC’s six colleges.

“Diversity and inclusion are central to our mission and pursuit of excellence,” said MUSC President David J. Cole, M.D., FACS, “and increasing scholarship support is critical to reaching this goal. We are grateful to the Alumni Association, our alumni and the community for making scholarships a priority on Giving Tuesday.”

In addition to scholarships, money raised on Giving Tuesday will advance research, enhance patient care and help to meet MUSC’s other greatest needs across the enterprise.

The single largest gift from an individual came from Pam Harrington. The nearly $500,000 she gave will help to provide emergency care and other medical services to residents of Johns, Kiawah and Seabrook islands. More specifically, it will support the building of the new Sea Islands Medical Pavilion, which will serve those island communities.

Hank and Laurel Greer, who made the largest single gift on Giving Tuesday last year, generously gave again to the MUSC Health Heart and Vascular Center. Their gift of $250,000 will support the Hank and Laurel Greer Endowed Chair in Electrophysiology. An endowed chair is a prestigious honor and a powerful tool for recruiting and retaining world-renowned leaders in patient care, education and research.

Gifts of all sizes have the power to change what’s possible at MUSC. Of the more than 300 gifts the MUSC Foundation received on Giving Tuesday, approximately 95% were less than $10,000, and 86% were less than $1,000.

Dozens shared why they gave, on the MUSC Foundation’s Giving Tuesday activity page. Here are a few of the highlights:

Azizi wants donors to know just how meaningful their gifts are. “Your incredible support of MUSC’s mission will make a profound impact on countless lives,” she said . “We can’t thank you enough.”

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