Criminal Defense Attorney in John's Island, SC

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When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients' cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring - a criminal defense attorney on John's Island, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

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Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC

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Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in John's Island

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry's history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of John's Island's legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in John's Island, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system's ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in John's Island:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In John's Island, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney's role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime - a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in John's Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in John's Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC

Criminal Case Timeline In John's Island, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in John's Island, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone - most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of John's Island's criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in John's Island, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant's acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in John's Island, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Criminal Defense Attorney John's Island, SC

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a "count." During this phase, the State will gather a "grand jury" comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant's case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor's job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client's innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution's case.

Typically, a trial in John's Island includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State's Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense's Case
  • The State's Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in John's Island, SC

Proposed Johns Island development raises traffic and flooding concerns

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - People who live off Southwick Drive on Johns Island could see more development. However, people that live in this area have great concerns about how this could make traffic and flooding worse.With many cars driving on Southwick Drive at high speeds, resident Karyn Buckley says she sees a lot of wrecks.“It’s the cut-through road between Maybank and Brownswood,” Buckley said. “In those three years, I’ve had eight vehicles in my ditches and three near-misses and it’s ...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - People who live off Southwick Drive on Johns Island could see more development. However, people that live in this area have great concerns about how this could make traffic and flooding worse.

With many cars driving on Southwick Drive at high speeds, resident Karyn Buckley says she sees a lot of wrecks.

“It’s the cut-through road between Maybank and Brownswood,” Buckley said. “In those three years, I’ve had eight vehicles in my ditches and three near-misses and it’s not safe.”

According to Charleston Police Department, the surrounding roads like Maybank Highway and Brownswood Road have had three deadly crashes since 2019. This is right where Middleburg Communities is planning to develop multi-family homes.

John Roberts also lives off Southwick Drive and says he’s not fully against the development.

“Even though it’s going to bring I think more to it with what they’re proposing, there’s going to be a different way out,” Roberts said. “I think it will still increase traffic through there.”

Middleburg Communities is proposing to rezone 16 acres of land from about 128 homes at one unit per acre to at least 160 homes at six units per acre. The developers would not speak on camera, but they did tell me they will put a conservation easement on the surrounding wetlands to prevent anyone else from developing on it in the future.

“With the new developments that went in, proper draining done there but poor draining downstream, so it all backs up, floods roads,” Roberts said. “We get cars in ditches all the time.”

Roberts says his house flooded severely during Hurricane Ian. Buckley says it floods around her home after a normal rainstorm.

“We need just a little more control,” Buckley said. “We need more infrastructure, better infrastructure. Drainage. Speed control.”

People that live off Southwick Drive say developers don’t know what it’s like to really live in this area.

“If you lived here and worked here and did the real life versus the money side of it or the paper side of it,” Buckley said. “It doesn’t work.”

The city of Charleston will be deciding whether this property will be rezoned to multifamily on Nov. 16.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Thanksgiving food giveaway feeds families on Johns, Wadmalaw Islands in South Carolina

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The 15th annual Feeding of the Multitude event was held from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Haut Gap Middle School on Johns Island.Twenty-four separate church congregations came together as one to feed neighbors on the Johns and Wadmalaw Islands.“We don’t want anyone on these islands to go hungry,” Feeding of the Multitude outreach coordinator Easter Laroche said, “so the purpose of it is just to ensure that the residents of Johns and Wadmalaw Islands are gi...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The 15th annual Feeding of the Multitude event was held from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Haut Gap Middle School on Johns Island.

Twenty-four separate church congregations came together as one to feed neighbors on the Johns and Wadmalaw Islands.

“We don’t want anyone on these islands to go hungry,” Feeding of the Multitude outreach coordinator Easter Laroche said, “so the purpose of it is just to ensure that the residents of Johns and Wadmalaw Islands are given a hot Thanksgiving meal.”

A hot Thanksgiving meal that residents like Lisa Pitts said she is extremely grateful for.

“Since I’m on a fixed income,” Pitts said, “I think it’s good that the community helps people in need have a thankful Thanksgiving.”

In the generous and giving spirit that embodies what Thanksgiving is all about, many who drove through the line came to pick up items for other families.

“It’s people that can’t get here to get a bag,” Marcia Brown said, “so I said let me just come down and get a bag. If it’s somebody that needs a turkey or need a thing, I hand it to them and say, ‘Here, Happy Thanksgiving.’”

“I know I got a gift card so I can take it to a family,” Doris Bright, pastor of Wesley United Methodist Church said, “and I have a bag of groceries to take to a family. Coming to see this is marvelous that we’re doing the work of Jesus Christ. To go to those who can’t come to us.”

With more than 1300 meals handed out Saturday, organizers said they are blessed to be able to help so many community members ahead of Thanksgiving.

“The smiles on their faces and the interaction and the fun,” lead organizer Claudia Boyce said. “Everybody is having fun today, and that’s what the Lord wants, he wants us to be joyful and we are joyful. So, it’s a great day.”

Volunteers said this year’s event is one of the biggest and most successful they have had in the past 15 years.

Johns Island man provided fake name before jumping from I-26 overpass, report says

NORTH CHARLESTON — A man provided Charleston County deputies with a different name before he took off running across several lanes of a major road and jumping from an overpass.Kelvin Cole, 56, died Oct. 28 after being struck by multiple cars on Interstate 26. Investigators later determined he had active arrest warrants from Charleston County’s Family Court and the S.C. Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services.Cole, who lived and worked as a welder in Johns Island, was riding in the passenger seat of a car...

NORTH CHARLESTON — A man provided Charleston County deputies with a different name before he took off running across several lanes of a major road and jumping from an overpass.

Kelvin Cole, 56, died Oct. 28 after being struck by multiple cars on Interstate 26. Investigators later determined he had active arrest warrants from Charleston County’s Family Court and the S.C. Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services.

Cole, who lived and worked as a welder in Johns Island, was riding in the passenger seat of a car when a deputy stopped it for alleged traffic violations. The car’s 31-year-old driver was ultimately given a warning.

Attempts to reach Cole’s family Nov. 2 were unsuccessful.

The Charleston County Sheriff’s Office released an incident report Nov. 2, several days after Cole’s death. It provides new details on what preceded the moment he ran from the deputy.

Deputy Tanner Buller was patrolling around 10:30 p.m. near Stall and Mazyck roads in North Charleston when he noticed a white SUV swerve several times from its lane, the report states. The driver also failed to use a turn signal when changing lanes.

Buller, who has worked in law enforcement for five years, had a deputy-in-training with him during the stop. He flipped on his blue lights and the SUV pulled over onto the Ashley Phosphate Road overpass, which sits atop I-26.

The South Carolina Aquarium hosts around half a million visitors a year, is home to more than 5,000 animals – all of them native to the Palmetto State – and has the deepest tank in all of North America.

Buller spoke with the car’s driver through the passenger-side window. The driver denied he had been drinking, but Buller wrote he could smell marijuana and alcohol coming from the vehicle’s passenger side. The car’s passenger, later identified as Cole, told the deputy his name was Raymond Brown.

Buller had both men get out of their car so he could search them. The driver admitted he’d smoked marijuana earlier in the day, the report states.

When Cole exited the car, Buller saw a beer can near the passenger seat. Buller found Cole’s driver’s license and noticed it did not match the name he’d provided the deputy.

Buller tried to detain Cole “but he pulled away and fled on foot” across Ashley Phosphate Road, the report states. The deputy chased Cole while trying to avoid traffic.

He repeatedly asked Cole to stop but the man “eventually jumped over the guardrail,” the report states. Buller saw Cole’s hands “grabbing the rail for a brief period” before he appeared to let go and fall onto I-26, the report states.

Buller never drew his weapon, said Andrew Knapp, a Sheriff’s Office spokesman. The deputy remains on duty. In addition to conducting its own internal review, the Sheriff’s Office also requested State Law Enforcement Division investigate the incident, Knapp said.

Investigators searched Cole’s name in a federal database and found he had an active warrant with the probation department, as well as three bench warrants with Charleston County’s Family Court.

Cole was the defendant in an ongoing child support case filed in 2016, court records show.

He was placed on a year of probation in February 2020 after pleading guilty in Charleston County to a forgery charge. Cole’s probation sentence would not be terminated until he paid all associated fees, said Anita Dantzler, a department spokeswoman.

Cole owed nearly $2,500 to the department, records show.

Thursday headlines: Gusty wind, rain to come today from Tropical Storm Nicole

South Carolinians should expect a lot of wind and rain as Tropical Storm Nicole crawls north from Florida through Georgia today. While the center of the storm, downgraded from a hurricane early today when it made landfall in south Florida, is not expected in South Carolina, gusty winds are predicted across the Palmetto State. A tropical storm warning has been issued (see map) from Beaufort County to Georgetown County a...

South Carolinians should expect a lot of wind and rain as Tropical Storm Nicole crawls north from Florida through Georgia today. While the center of the storm, downgraded from a hurricane early today when it made landfall in south Florida, is not expected in South Carolina, gusty winds are predicted across the Palmetto State. A tropical storm warning has been issued (see map) from Beaufort County to Georgetown County along the South Carolina coast.

Meanwhile, some Charleston County schools have switched to eLearning ahead of the tropical storm’s arrival.

In other headlines:

Effort to further ban abortion in S.C. fails. South Carolina senators on Wednesday rejected a House-backed proposed bill that would further ban abortion. House members did not return for a meeting to attempt to compromise on the bill.

North Charleston unveils new pedestrian bridge. North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey introduced Wednesday the Noisette Creek Pedestrian Bridge. The bridge connects Riverfront Park to the north side of Noisette Creek.

Charleston city council member discusses youth curfew. Charleston City Councilman Mike Seekings has opened the discussion among other council members due to the recent teen-related shooting on King Street. Seekings said a curfew will help keep children safe and proposed that the best practice would be for children 17 and under with a curfew of 10 p.m. or 11 p.m.

Proposed Johns Island development leads to flooding, traffic concerns. An intersection on Southwick Drive on Johns Island is expected to undergo redevelopment in the near future, but many residents see the redevelopment as a sign of heavier traffic and worse flooding, a problem the intersection already struggles with.

Laffitte family members testify in federal case. Family members of former bank CEO Russell Laffitte took the stand at his federal trial, revealing that the case against disbarred lawyer Alex Murdaugh alerted the family to Laffitte’s role in Murdaugh’s activities.

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Beaufort denied couple chance to build their dream home. Was it ‘mob rule’ or the right call?

The city of Beaufort has denied an annexation request that “got extraordinarily personal” and divided the City Council and neighbors while raising questions about fairness, future growth and the environmental impacts of docks on marshland.A 4.7-acre property at 7597 Patterson Road, situated on a high bluff overlooking the Whale Branch River and Middle Creek, caused the controversy...

The city of Beaufort has denied an annexation request that “got extraordinarily personal” and divided the City Council and neighbors while raising questions about fairness, future growth and the environmental impacts of docks on marshland.

A 4.7-acre property at 7597 Patterson Road, situated on a high bluff overlooking the Whale Branch River and Middle Creek, caused the controversy. It is located seven miles from the heart of Beaufort, near Clarendon farms, which the city annexed in 2006.

David Greer and Amy Wylie of Spartanburg, who were proposing to buy the land, asked the city to annex the waterfront property into the city limits and rezone it. It’s currently in Beaufort County’s jurisdiction. They hoped, David Greer said, to build their “forever home” on the land a real estate notice described as “magical.”

Instead, the property turned into a battleground over annexation. Neighbors worried about the potential uses — including a plan by Greer and Wylie, who are married, for a 343-foot-long dock into the marsh in order to reach deeper water — if it was annexed into the city and rezoned. The maximum length of a dock in a riparian area under Beaufort County’s rules is 300 feet.

Greer and Wylie and their attorney, Cody Lenhardt, argued that, technically, the issue at hand was solely annexation — not a request for a dock, which involves other permitting authorities.

By voting down the annexation request because of a proposed dock, Greer said, the city was creating a questionable standard for future requests. He and Wylie did not skirt any laws, they added, and worked with the state Department of Health and Environmental Control regarding the dock.

The dock, Lenhardt said, would have been extended to a navigable creek. The neighbors, he added, have docks, too.

“This is very clearly a situation,” Lenhardt said, “where you have those who have, do not want one more.”

But neighbors, including Patrick Matthews and Margie Bright Matthews, who is a Democratic state senator from Colleton, who live immediately next door to the property, accused Greer and Wylie of seeking the annexation and asking for the land to be rezoned to take advantage of the city’s less stringent waterfront building rules to construct the longer dock through the marsh to reach the creek. They called it zoning or jurisdiction shopping.

“This thing doesn’t have the right flavor,” said Daryl Ferguson, one of the neighbors questioning the annexation and the dock plans.

The environmental impacts of the longer dock through marshland concerned him, Ferguson said, including what it would do for access for dozens of kayakers who he says enjoy the area.

The City Council, by a 3-2 split vote, denied the annexation last Tuesday. The decision came, Mayor Stephen Murray noted, on the same evening the council unanimously OK’d a similar type of annexation at 139 Chowan Creek Bluff Road. Nobody, Murray pointed out, objected to that request.

“So I fear we make a decision based on mob rule,” said Murray, “not on planning” and what’s in the best interest of residents and the city’s vision for growth over the next 30 or 40 years.

To be sure, Murray said, the decision was “a tough one. “Leapfrogging” out to the remote area, to annex a property, and the idea of zoning shopping, Murray said, bothered him.

But, Murray added, as the city continues to grow, it has a responsibility to taxpayers, who already are subsidizing services to outlying areas, to incrementally annex properties with owners who wish to join the city and take advantage of its services. The land, he added, is within the city’s growth boundaries and service delivery area.

The annexation, and a proposed rezoning of the land, Murray noted, would actually have provided more protections for the neighborhood because only single-family homes would have been allowed, whereas commercial uses are allowed now.

But others could not stomach the idea of the annexation request if the purpose was to change the jurisdiction in order to get a longer dock, even if the city has no control over dock permits.

It was clear to Councilman Phil Cromer that Greer and Wylie only wanted to join the city to build the dock, which he equated to extending private property rights through the public marsh. “And,” Cromer said, “I can’t go along with that.”

Councilman Mitch Mitchell called the annexation request a “work around” to get the dock approved, and Councilman Neil Lipsitz also voted against it. Murray and Councilman Mike McFee voted for the annexation.

Greer and Wylie had wanted to build a legacy property for their family on the land, which is owned by Inez Johnson of New York and advertised for $399,000, said Lenhardt, their attorney. They’ve not finalized any decisions on what they plan to do in light of the annexation denial, which had been a condition of the purchase.

“Nobody in the neighborhood ever expressed any interest in purchasing the property until my clients found the property and fell in love with it and wanted to make a forever home,” Lenhardt said. “What they’ve done is pretty surprising.”

Phil Nagley, a Realtor, said the offer from Wylie and Greer for the Patterson Road property has been withdrawn. A backup offer was in place, he said, but he could not say from whom because the sale has not closed yet.

While not denying their intent to seek a permit for the dock, Greer said he was working with DHEC and called other accusations that were made about their intent for the property in general “pretty hurtful to myself and my wife.”

John Sandfort, another neighbor, said there were real concerns about the delivery of emergency services if a single property was added to the city while other properties remained in the county’s jurisdiction.

There already had been one instance in the area, Sandfort said, when a barn burned down at Clarendon farm because of uncertainty between fire departments about who was responsible for covering the area.

“Our concern is if we end up with one piece of city property under residential restrictions, and everyone else is county, would we have the same problem?” Sandfort said.

The Coastal Conservation League unsuccessfully lobbied the city to hold off making decisions on the annexation requests for both 7597 Patterson Road and 139 Chowan Creek Bluff Road.

CCL’s Grant McClure noted both properties are on the water’s edge and subject to Beaufort County’s more rigorous rules protecting riparian buffers. Those buffers are critical, McClure said, because they reduce erosion, provide wildlife habitat, help maintain water quality and increase property values.

The city, McClure said, should pass regulations that match the county’s. CCL sought the delay until those new regulations could be acted upon.

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