Criminal Defense Attorney in John's Island, SC

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Fighting For You

When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients’ cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring – a criminal defense attorney on John's Island, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

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What Clients Say About Us

Richard Waring

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in John's Island

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry’s history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of John's Island’s legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in John's Island, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system’s ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in John's Island:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense
Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In John's Island, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In John's Island, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney’s role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime – a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in John's Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in John's Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Knowing Your Rights
Knowing Your Rights

Criminal Case Timeline In John's Island, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in John's Island, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone – most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of John's Island’s criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Arrest And Investigation

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Initial Bond Setting

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in John's Island, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Preliminary Hearing

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Initial Appearance

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Plea Offers

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant’s acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Discovery

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in John's Island, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Indictment

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a “count.” During this phase, the State will gather a “grand jury” comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant’s case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor’s job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client’s innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution’s case.

Typically, a trial in John's Island includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State’s Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense’s Case
  • The State’s Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in John's Island

Letters: Johns Island development is leading to dangerous potholes, accidents

An article in the Dec. 5 Post and Courier noted that a developer wants to build a multifamily development on 47 acres on Maybank Highway.This is extremely disturbing to the residents of Johns Island.Due to the rapid, out-of-control development of the island, residents are experiencing a very negative effect on our quality of life and our safety.Our roads are in terrible condition due to the excessive traffic, including heavy dump trucks for which the roads clearly weren’t designedThis has led to numerous dan...

An article in the Dec. 5 Post and Courier noted that a developer wants to build a multifamily development on 47 acres on Maybank Highway.

This is extremely disturbing to the residents of Johns Island.

Due to the rapid, out-of-control development of the island, residents are experiencing a very negative effect on our quality of life and our safety.

Our roads are in terrible condition due to the excessive traffic, including heavy dump trucks for which the roads clearly weren’t designed

This has led to numerous dangerous potholes and vehicle accidents.

There were 69 car fatalities in Charleston County in 2020, a number of which were on Johns Island.

A recent study conducted by Insurify Insights found that Johns Island has the most accident-prone drivers in the United States.

Due to the heavy traffic, it is difficult for emergency vehicles to get to their destination in a safe, timely manner.

Flooding has increased as trees are clear-cut from property and are replaced with asphalt, multiple apartment complexes and homes.

The last thing we need is 47 more acres of tree-filled land to be turned into more multifamily development.

A recent letter to the editor pointed out that the residents of Johns Island have been pleading to the city of Charleston and Charleston County to stop approving more development until we can get the infrastructure in place to support the existing residents.

Our pleas fall on deaf ears.

JEANNE WILLIAMS

Johns Island

Two letters published in the Dec. 12 Post and Courier expressed concerns about two unrelated subjects.

A Wadmalaw Island resident wrote about the relentless development of what was once pristine rural land around the tri-county area. I sympathized because the same song is being sung seemingly everywhere in the Lowcountry.

The second letter talked about the teacher shortage and how it is negatively affecting our quality of life.

That letter listed a number of suggestions to help alleviate the shortage. Several items involved needing more support and awareness from local and state politicians.

I rarely see any explanation or rebuttal to these letters from any of our legislators or council members. I would love to see them explain to the public in writing how they think relentless development is making our lives better.

And please don’t keep saying it’s for a bigger tax base.

Our teachers need increased support. They are an investment in our future and we should start taking note of that.

I encourage council members and legislators to respond to these issues.

Their collective silence to issues voiced by the public makes it seem like they don’t hear our complaints and concerns.

EDDIE COLLINS

Mount Pleasant

It seems that every time Charleston experiences a flood event, many point to climate change.

Land subsidence, another important component to sea level change, is rarely mentioned. Subsidence is largely a natural process, but it has a significant human component.

As development in the Lowcountry has exploded and demand on groundwater has increased, aquifers are not recharging fast enough to prevent land above from sinking.

Another problem is the loss of wetlands that result in more runoff, intensifying soil erosion.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, sea level at Charleston Harbor has increased about 13 inches over the past century. But according to the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, the land around Charleston has sunk about 5 inches over the same period. As development increases, so does the sinking.

We could spend billions of dollars to fight climate change, but for Charleston, it won’t solve the problem.

JOSEPH LEONARD

Charleston

About two months ago, I sent letters of complaint to the headquarters of a large health care organization with a Lowcountry presence.

The letters were addressed to a corporate officer and at least one to the local CEO.

The letters contained documented violations of health care regulations and a potential breach of patient health care information security.

One of the things specifically asked for was an audit of my health care record looking for unauthorized access.

I waited for a reply, an acknowledgement or some action. Nothing.

In the past, such complaints were met with at least a form letter in response and in most cases, some positive action.

Apparently not here, not now in today’s business world.

It seems as if the corporation isn’t interested in what consumers have to say.

I’m a bit frustrated but I won’t be going away anytime soon. I gave the organization a chance to self-correct; perhaps when the complaints start coming from its regulators it might start listening.

I find it ironic that this particular organization talks about being responsive and responsible in its literature. Perhaps the leaders should reacquaint themselves with their own code of ethics.

TIMOTHY C. KIEL

Mount Pleasant

Letters: Find place for John C. Calhoun statue in SC

The most maligned statesman in the history of the United States is John C. Calhoun. Recent events are further evidence. His monument has been destroyed, his statue consigned to a warehouse.The latest insult on the horizon is a plan to send that statue to Los Angeles.He was not responsible for the recent tragedies we have experienced. We are.Until we stop pointing fingers elsewhere, we cannot escape the circumstances we find ourselves in.Nor was Calhoun the cause of the Civil War. He died in 1850, but predicted it ...

The most maligned statesman in the history of the United States is John C. Calhoun. Recent events are further evidence. His monument has been destroyed, his statue consigned to a warehouse.

The latest insult on the horizon is a plan to send that statue to Los Angeles.

He was not responsible for the recent tragedies we have experienced. We are.

Until we stop pointing fingers elsewhere, we cannot escape the circumstances we find ourselves in.

Nor was Calhoun the cause of the Civil War. He died in 1850, but predicted it on his deathbed. It would occur and be calamitous to this country he loved.

He was not a secessionist, though he believed in the right of secession. He was a Unionist.

To a friend, he is quoted: “If I am judged by my acts, I trust I shall be found as firm a friend of the Union as any man in it.”

His statement that slavery was a “positive good” was made in the context of other remarks: He was comparing the paternalist plantation system to the “wage slaves” of the North who toiled in the unhealthy sweatshops for unreasonable hours. Some historians today seem to ignore facts by choice or ignorance.

Yet in 1957 a select committee in the U.S. Senate, headed by then-Sen. John F. Kennedy, unanimously selected Calhoun as one of the five greatest senators.

That resulted in his portrait being hung in the Senate reception room.

He is not the Darth Vader of our time.

Nevertheless, Charleston City Council is considering loaning the Calhoun statue to a group of Los Angeles-based art exhibitors.

I suspect that the statue of Calhoun will be cast as a monster as in some Ringling Bros. circus format, a display that will taint South Carolina as a whole.

That must not happen.

Right the wrong already done, find a suitable place for his statue and allow South Carolinians to determine his legacy.

THOMAS P. LOWNDES JR.

Charleston

Have Charleston County parents not seen the steady decline in our schools long enough?

We need to find out why the Charleston County School Board does not trust parents and community members to have input before they decide how to use money meant for students.

The recent series of closed-door meetings and lack of transparency are just the tip of the iceberg.

Those of us who are educators and citizens have watched similar board actions since the 1970s.

The game is the same, but the faces change. Many board members are not educators.

We hire Gerrita Postlewait, an outstanding superintendent, and then she resigns.

Another mystery is why she was replaced on an interim basis by the chief financial officer, who is not an educator.

These board members are not worthy of being reelected.

Ms. Postlewait tried for almost six years to fight for the good of our teachers and students.

I sent a letter to the school board and copied various legislators when this resignation transpired.

No board members responded.

We seem to have left our children and teachers without a qualified superintendent to help guide our next generation of leaders.

Parents and elected leaders, help us.

CINDY CLARK

Charleston

With political concern over how citizens are holding up economically in the pandemic, it would seem reasonable to ask our state Legislature to consider giving us most of that extra $6 billion by cutting our taxes.

How about just part of that $6 billion? We could make good use of it.

FORREST BONNER

Mount Pleasant

Thomas Jefferson said, “When a man assumes a public trust, he should consider himself as public property.”

Public trust is a fundamental precept of democratic government.

All elected representatives are trustees of the public; they occupy positions of public trust.

Betrayals of public trust in all forms (bribery, favoritism, misuse of funds, special interest groups, unethical lobbying practices, cartels and more) erode confidence in government.

They encourage negative (cynical), distrustful perceptions of a representative’s sincerity and integrity. And they diminish the legitimacy of government.

Publicly exposing and severely sanctioning those who treat this trust with irreverence or disrespect is an essential component of sound democratic government.

It is improbable that mandating ethics training for sheriffs will significantly diminish public trust betrayals.

A more practical, realistic solution is to increase the cost and consequences of being caught.

JON E. WALKER

Johns Island

A Tuesday letter asked how a driver of an electric vehicle car would fare if stuck in the snowstorm that tied up Interstate 95 for 24 hours.

EV heaters draw between 1.5 and 3 kilowatts. A typical EV battery holds at least 100 kilowatt hours of charge, so a full charge would last at least 30 hours.

Even my plug-in hybrid has a 14.4 kwh battery, so I could sit in a snowstorm for at least 4 hours without even running the gas engine.

Also, there would be no chance of accidental death from carbon monoxide — unlike sitting in an idling gas-powered vehicle.

FRED BOMBELYN

Charleston

Why I returned to Charleston, SC

These are contributor-submitted pieces. Want to join the conversation? We invite you to write for us. Learn how to share your voice here.Back in November, we asked readers who had left the city why they returned to Charleston. We love these stories of locals at heart who knew they wanted to ...

These are contributor-submitted pieces. Want to join the conversation? We invite you to write for us. Learn how to share your voice here.

Back in November, we asked readers who had left the city why they returned to Charleston. We love these stories of locals at heart who knew they wanted to make their way back to the Holy City. We’re lucky to live here, and happy to welcome them home. “I was born in Charleston and lived here until I was 22. In order for my husband to complete his studies at Emory graduate school, we moved to Atlanta, Georgia. After fifty years, I moved back to Charleston because it will be my home always. The smell of marsh gas, the mosquitos, the humidity and anything else that tried to keep me away failed to do so.” —Reader Teresa R. I left due to a divorce and had 2 small children and returned to my home state so family could help with child care. I really did not want to leave and knew that I would return. Reason, quality of life! You can have culture and the beach in a very unique setting! I fell in love with Charleston, it is my happy place! So happy to be back!” —Reader Linda N.

“I moved here after college to live with CofC grads. I was here for 2 years and left to get a tech job closer to family. After two years, and the ability to work remotely — I couldn’t pass up the weather and the ease of travel to get back home. The weather in the north is brutal. Also, the cost of living compared to Boston was a big pull!” —Reader Shane W.Retired in Charleston 1985. Went to Atlanta for new challenges. Retired again, and one more time! Moved back to Charleston in 2019. My 15 family members live here! Love them!” —Reader Ken B. “Growing up a military brat, my dad retired in Myrtle Beach where I graduated Socastee HS, graduated Horry G-Town Tech College and… joined the Coast Guard! Ironically I was assigned to Charleston, SC, in January 1990 in the aftermath of Charleston’s infamous visitor, Hurricane Hugo. I was here in CHS from 1900 to 1993 and I enjoyed it very much. (I lived in West Ashley, N. Charleston & Mt Pleasant.)

Nearly 33 years later, having been to 53 countries, lived in NC, CA, HI, USVI, TX, VA… temporarily staying in many more cities/states, Charleston is where I decided to return to and retire in 2012. Now, I’m not going to lie… it was #3 on my list: first was Maui (became very difficult logistically), next was San Diego (became way too unfriendly on a retirement income […] so here I am.

I loved almost everything about Charleston (particularly James Island). Minus the bugs and humidity it’s a first class city to live in. Now I am quite literally sick over the number of apartments and condos being built in the Charleston Metro area and could not even imagine what has become of Summerville and John’s Island. But here my wife and I will stay, come what may. All in all I still love living here, despite the growth which this city’s infrastructure will not be able to sustain.

We enjoy the delicious food, history, culture, weather, cost of living, arts, festivals, city sports teams ie; Rays, Riverdogs, Battery and proximity to the coast. City/state taxes are not excessive and costs for government services are fair. It’s a relatively clean and safe city compared to others similar in size and population. So thanks for asking… interesting to see how the city will grow in the future.” —Readers Scott + Kim M.

Restaurant Week 2022 in Charleston, SC

Charleston Restaurant Week is (almost) upon us, friends. This celebration, held Jan. 13-23, sheds light on local restaurants and provides the opportunity to try something new from Lowcountry favorites like 39 Rue de Jean, Halls Chophouse + MESU.If you’ve never experienced the holy grail of the Charleston food + bev industry that is Restaurant Week, you’ll need a bit of guidance, as the choice...

Charleston Restaurant Week is (almost) upon us, friends. This celebration, held Jan. 13-23, sheds light on local restaurants and provides the opportunity to try something new from Lowcountry favorites like 39 Rue de Jean, Halls Chophouse + MESU.

If you’ve never experienced the holy grail of the Charleston food + bev industry that is Restaurant Week, you’ll need a bit of guidance, as the choices can get overwhelming — though too many options is never a bad thing, right?

Different eateries offer special deals to encourage people to get out + dine in at local restaurants. With 40+ Charleston area restaurants participating, the hardest part will be choosing where to dine. We’re here to highlight a few of the participating restaurants and their Restaurant Week deals.

39 Rue de Jean, 39 John St. | 3 dinner courses for $45 | Stop by this brick-walled bistro + enjoy French classics and cocktails from the bar.

82 Queen, 82 Queen St. | 2 lunch courses for $20, 3 dinner courses for $40 | Not sold on the award-winning She Crab soup? Take a look at the jambalaya and get back to us.

Bourbon N’ Bubbles, 570 King St. | 3 dinner courses for $45 | We have to say, it’ll be hard to decide between the bruschetta + crispy tempura shrimp.

CO, 340 King St. | 3 dinner courses for $25 or 4 for $30 | Spicy crab rangoon with the option of a sake pairing? Sign us up.

Coast Bar & Grill, 39D John St. | 3 dinner courses for $45 | You can’t go wrong with any dish from this seafood eatery, but the surf & turf is definitely grabbing our attention.

Coastal Provisions, 200 Grand Pavilion Blvd., Isle of Palms | 3 dinner courses for $40 | Calling all gnocchi lovers: the sweet potato gnocchi dish looks ah-mazing.

FortyEight – Wine Bar & Kitchen, 547 Freshfields Dr., Kiawah Island | 3 dinner courses for $35 | There’s just something special about the ambiance of a wine bar. Pair it with the FortyEight Pimento Burger? We’re in.

Florence’s Lowcountry Kitchen, 90 Folly Rd Blvd., Ste B-4 | 2 lunch courses for $20, 3 dinner courses for $30 | This Lowcountry eatery has blessed us with two opportunities to enjoy its delicious Southern dishes. I’ll have an order of the shrimp & grits, please.

Frothy Beard Brewing Co.,1401 Sam Rittenberg Blvd.| 2 people for $30 | Pro tip: This brewery includes two pints of beer in its Restaurant Week deal.

Jalisco Taqueria & Tequila, 1217 Folly Rd. | Saturdays only: 3 lunch courses for $25, 3 dinner courses for $25 | Enchiladas, and salsa, and churros — oh my.

MESU, 570 King St. | 3 dinner courses for $25 | Can’t decide between Mexican + sushi? Grab an app of chips and guac before enjoying one sushi roll as your main course. Best of both worlds.

New Realm Brewery, 880 Island Park Dr. | 3 dinner courses for $30 | We can confirm that the Ultimate Wagyu Burger is worth the hype.

Swamp Fox Restaurant & Bar at Francis Marion Hotel, 387 King St. | 2 lunch courses for $20, 3 dinner courses for $40 | Enjoy all your Lowcountry favorites at this restaurant. We’re looking at you, hush puppy + deviled egg lovers.

The Salty Dog Cafe – Seabrook, 1882 Andell Bluff Blvd., Johns Island | 3 courses for 2 people for $50 | Looking for your fish ‘n’ chips fix? Look no further.

Virginia’s on King, 412 King St. | 2 for $15 brunch, 3 dinner courses for $30 | Mix it up and enjoy brunch at this popular spot, including a mimosa + your choice of a breakfast burrito or strawberry waffles.

Pro tip: Make sure you’re staying up to date on the restaurants’ latest COVID-19 updates and potential closures.

The best part? This isn’t all. Click here to see all 47 participating Charleston area restaurants + the deals they’re offering.

Maggie Murdaugh left Alex Murdaugh all of her property when she died, her will shows

Maggie Murdaugh, whose murder in June, along with her son’s, sparked a maelstrom of misconduct allegations and media attention for husband Alex Murdaugh, left all of her property to her husband when she died, according to a copy of her last will and testament.The S.C. Law Enforcement Division has announced no arrests or suspects in the murders of Maggie, 52, and Paul Murdaugh, 22. But Maggie Murdaugh’s will, signed in 2005, and her estate records provide a few details about the prominent Hampton family.The family, a...

Maggie Murdaugh, whose murder in June, along with her son’s, sparked a maelstrom of misconduct allegations and media attention for husband Alex Murdaugh, left all of her property to her husband when she died, according to a copy of her last will and testament.

The S.C. Law Enforcement Division has announced no arrests or suspects in the murders of Maggie, 52, and Paul Murdaugh, 22. But Maggie Murdaugh’s will, signed in 2005, and her estate records provide a few details about the prominent Hampton family.

The family, already well known in the Lowcountry legal community both for its clout and for a 2019 fatal boating accident that implicated Paul as the drunk driver, was thrust back into the spotlight this year following the murders.

Alex Murdaugh, 53, a suspended attorney, has seen a dizzying fall from grace since then and is now in jail facing criminal charges that allege he orchestrated his own botched murder in September and stole money from clients for years.

It’s unclear what property Maggie Murdaugh owned when she died. However, her will, signed Aug. 15, 2005, appears to indicate that Alex Murdaugh is entitled to the family’s 1,770-acre property that straddles Hampton and Colleton counties.

He had owned the property, known as “Moselle,” since 2013 but transferred it to his wife in 2016, property records show.

One of Alex Murdaugh’s attorneys, Jim Griffin, previously acknowledged to FOX Carolina News in October that his client has been a person of interest in the murders of his wife and son “from the get go.” However, he said that Murdaugh had no motive to kill them.

Reached by phone Tuesday, Griffin said he had seen Maggie’s will and did not believe “in any form or fashion” that it would be a motive for his client to be involved in her death.

“I think her untimely death actually works harm to his financial planning by having the (Moselle) property conveyed back to him through probate,” he said. “It opens it up to creditors’ claims and, before, it was protected.”

Asked if Alex Murdaugh, who called 911 to report the deaths of his wife and son, still maintains his innocence, Griffin said: “Of course.”

Griffin, with Murdaugh’s other lawyer, Dick Harpootlian, asked a judge to reconsider his decision in November to freeze Murdaugh’s assets and appoint financial overseers. Griffin said he did not know how the receivership affects the transfer of Maggie’s property to her husband, calling it “uncharted waters.”

One oddity in Maggie’s last will and testament is that it listed her sister, Marian Proctor, as the person who would handle her estate. But the sister’s name was crossed out in pen, and over it was written Randolph Murdaugh III — Maggie’s father-in-law, who died after a long illness three days after Maggie was killed.

Griffin said he did not know why or when the name was crossed out.

“My understanding is that the will that is probated is the original will, so that would have been something [Maggie] did during her lifetime,” he said. “It was not done after her death, I can tell you that ... No one did that after her death, so that would have been done during her lifetime by her.”

Records show that on Dec. 9, Colleton County Probate Judge Ashley Amundson appointed John Marvin Murdaugh, Alex’s brother and Maggie’s brother-in-law, as the personal representative for Maggie’s estate.

John Marvin Murdaugh, reached by phone Wednesday, said he did not know when Marian Proctor’s name was crossed off the will.

The Island Packet and Beaufort Gazette on Thursday obtained an affidavit, signed Dec. 9 by Marian Proctor, saying she did not know until Dec. 7 that her sister had previously listed her as the personal representative of the estate.

A document attached to the affidavit, dated Dec. 13, shows that Marian Proctor renounced her right to handle Maggie Murdaugh’s estate. Proctor, in the affidavit, said she did not receive any money for signing away her right to handle her sister’s estate.

Both documents were filed in Colleton County Probate Court on Thursday — a day after a reporter’s conversation with John Marvin Murdaugh.

“I think that affidavit kind of clarifies any question that may arise — whether [Marian Proctor] got pushed out — if you’re somebody speculating,” he said.

The affidavit, John Marvin Murdaugh said, is intended to show that there is no issue between Maggie’s and Alex’s families.

“We’re all on very good terms,” he said. “Maggie certainly is very innocent in all this, and I just want to serve her the best that I can.”

Marian Proctor did not return a call for comment Wednesday.

Among the other records in Maggie Murdaugh’s estate, filed in probate court this month:

? Documents that show Alex Murdaugh and Buster Murdaugh, 25, (Alex and Maggie’s remaining son) separately renounced their rights to handle Maggie’s estate. Alex did so on Oct. 29; Buster, on Nov. 8.

? A letter from the judge urging John Marvin Murdaugh to notify a Summerville-based interior design company that Maggie’s estate is open for creditor’s claims. The company had filed a demand for notice in September. Demands for notice are filed in court when someone wants to be notified of new filings in a deceased person’s estate.

? An affidavit from John Marvin Murdaugh, signed Dec. 13, that says he will resolve the estate’s debts before distributing anything to brother Alex or nephew Buster.

Maggie Murdaugh’s last will and testament makes clear that all of her property should be left to her husband at her death.

When it was signed and notarized on Aug. 15, 2005, Maggie’s two sons — Buster and Paul — were children.

The will said that if both Maggie and Alex died, all of her property would go to her two sons, and Maggie’s sister would get full custody of her kids.

If the couple were to die before her kids turned 22 years old, all of Maggie’s property would go into a trust. That trust dissolved when Buster and Paul turned 22, according to the will.

Probate records show that two lawyers, Everett W. Bennett Jr. from Walterboro, and William G. Newsome from Columbia, are overseeing Maggie’s estate.

Neither lawyer returned a call for comment Tuesday.

News of the killings of Maggie and Paul Murdaugh shocked South Carolina’s Lowcountry. At the time, Paul was facing felony charges, accused of driving a boat while drunk in 2019, resulting in a crash that killed 19-year-old Mallory Beach.

In the six months since Paul and Maggie died, Alex Murdaugh has become the personification of a fall from grace.

He faces 48 criminal charges alleging financial crimes against former clients dating back to 2015, as well as fraud charges stemming from his botched suicide attempt.

But police have remained light-lipped about their investigation into the double homicide.

This story was originally published December 26, 2021 5:00 AM.

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