Criminal Defense Attorney in James Island, SC

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Fighting For You

When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients’ cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring – a criminal defense attorney on James Island, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

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What Clients Say About Us

Richard Waring

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in James Island

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry’s history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of James Island’s legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in James Island, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system’s ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in James Island:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense
Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In James Island, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In James Island, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney’s role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime – a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in James Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in James Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Knowing Your Rights
Knowing Your Rights

Criminal Case Timeline In James Island, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in James Island, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone – most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of James Island’s criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Arrest And Investigation

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Initial Bond Setting

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in James Island, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Preliminary Hearing

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Initial Appearance

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Plea Offers

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant’s acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Discovery

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in James Island, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Indictment

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a “count.” During this phase, the State will gather a “grand jury” comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant’s case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor’s job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client’s innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution’s case.

Typically, a trial in James Island includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State’s Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense’s Case
  • The State’s Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in James Island

Millers All Day debuts food truck as construction for second location starts on James Island

It’s difficult to snag a seat at popular King Street breakfast restaurant Millers All Day, which opened in Charleston in 2018. Starting Jan. 15, locals throughout the Charleston area will be able to order fried chicken biscuits, shrimp and grits, home fries and other Millers favorites from the eatery’s new food truck.“We’ve had a lot of people come to the downtown location and ask us to help them in other markets (and) get Millers there,&r...

It’s difficult to snag a seat at popular King Street breakfast restaurant Millers All Day, which opened in Charleston in 2018. Starting Jan. 15, locals throughout the Charleston area will be able to order fried chicken biscuits, shrimp and grits, home fries and other Millers favorites from the eatery’s new food truck.

“We’ve had a lot of people come to the downtown location and ask us to help them in other markets (and) get Millers there,” said co-owner Nathan Thurston. “Putting a brick-and-mortar in different areas is very challenging but we thought that a food truck might be a great way to bring Millers to the people because they’ve asked for it quite a bit.”

The truck will be run by staff members who will eventually work at Millers All Day’s second location in the former Zia Taqueria space in the Terrace Plaza Shopping Center on James Island, Thurston said. After searching for four months, Thurston and Millers co-owner Greg Johnsman of Marsh Hen Mill on Edisto Island found a California-made truck in Minnesota equipped with the tools necessary for cooking breakfast on-the-go.

“Finding one that was right for us took some time,” Thurston said. “The outfit of the truck — the equipment, the layout — was actually a great fit for us.”

The food truck will make its debut 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Jan. 15-16 at Brewlab Charleston (2200 Heriot St.). The truck will serve Millers favorites like its biscuit cinnamon roll; pimento cheeseburger with bacon and pepper jam; bacon, egg and cheese sandwich; and shrimp and grits, a recent hit at Millers All Day.

“We decided to kind of offer our most popular items on the truck,” Thurston said.

The truck will also serve specialty items like lobster fries, a dish Thurston said is their variation on lobster poutine. Millers’ fan-favorite home fries — boiled then fried to create a crispy home fry that’s tender inside — are topped with bacon, Mornay sauce, lobster, scallions and a sunny egg.

“It’s a beautiful dish and people love it, so pretty excited to get that out there,” Thurston said.

The food truck will likely pop up at local breweries following its weekend at Brewlab. Thurston said breweries are a great place to “catapult the truck” by offering brunch at times when food is sometimes not available for folks sampling the area’s craft beer. The truck is also available for private events.

While plans for the truck were being finalized, construction for Millers All Day’s second location at 1956 Maybank Highway commenced in December. Thurston anticipates the renovation will take 10-12 weeks and hopes to open in April 2022.

For Millers All Day’s food truck location and times, follow the restaurant on Instagram or check Street Food Finder.

Brack: Want to make a difference? Get involved

For a teenager in the 1970s, the Boy Scout Handbook offered an escape into a practical world that provided answers to lots of things for a young, curious mind: how to tie knots, start campfires, safely hike and camp in the woods, use a compass, identify trees and track animals. Manuals for merit badges provided more detailed information on everything from survival to citizenship. (In my view, the Boy Scouts’ three merit badge manuals on citizenship — for the community, nation and world — are better than the civics ...

For a teenager in the 1970s, the Boy Scout Handbook offered an escape into a practical world that provided answers to lots of things for a young, curious mind: how to tie knots, start campfires, safely hike and camp in the woods, use a compass, identify trees and track animals. Manuals for merit badges provided more detailed information on everything from survival to citizenship. (In my view, the Boy Scouts’ three merit badge manuals on citizenship — for the community, nation and world — are better than the civics materials provided in school.)

So it came as a surprise that a new book on all things maritime, appropriately called The Ocean, is based on a version of the Handbook, now called a Fieldbook, of nautical skills, as explained by co-author Chris Dixon of James Island.

A few years back, Dixon said he was talking with an old friend for whom he once worked, surfing buddy and laid-back singer/entrepreneur Jimmy Buffett. Over a plate of shrimp and grits, Dixon shared the concept of a new book of maritime skills — a kind of “Poseidon’s bible — a guide to all things ocean that’ll be fun to read in a hammock strung between two palm trees, but will also help save your ass in a pinch,” as he wrote in the introduction.

Buffett chuckled and said, “The stuff you only really learn from time on the water. … When I was a kid, I learned so much from this book called The Sea Scout Handbook,” which the authors then described as an inspiration for their new book.

They ended up sharing scores of practical skills for the water. Get a flavor through some of the subtitles in six chapters of the 350-page book:

Their book, in fact, inspired a cover feature story in the Charleston City Paper that showcases 29 different things regular people can do to help protect the ocean.

In addition to recommendations to get out on the water to learn it and love it, there are suggestions on how you can promote sustainability of the seas, protect local waterways and be good land stewards to help the ocean. Several ideas focus on how to get greener in your life intentionally to make a longer term difference with such actions as eliminating single-use plastics, not using hygiene products with plastic microbeads, properly disposing machine fluids, reducing harmful herbicides and pesticides that might run off into streams, and being careful with sunscreens that you use.

But the story also included practical ways to participate in democracy to make it stronger.

“Never underestimate your power to make a difference, through volunteerism, recycling, political advocacy, sharing via social media or engagement in citizen science projects,” S.C. Aquarium Executive Director Kevin Mills said.

Emily Cedzo of the Coastal Conservation League added, “Take action to protect the ocean. Whether it’s opposing offshore drilling or supporting protections for the endangered right whale, there’s a lot of information out there, so get some help gathering it. You can send emails or make calls to local, state and national officials or speak at public meetings.”

Bottom line: To make a difference in any endeavor in which you’re passionate — from protecting oceans to fighting to ensure fair election lines — get more involved. Connect with groups that share your passion. Vote. Help people register to vote. Interact with people in your neighborhood and get them to help. Donate to organizations that do what you want done. Support elected officials who you support by giving your time or money during campaign season.

As the Boy Scouts taught me, being a good citizen is about being involved. We need more of that spirit today to keep America moving forward.

Andy Brack is publisher Charleston City Paper. Have a comment? Send to: feedback@charlestoncitypaper.com.

SC closes on nuns’ James Island waterfront property for $23M with plans to make a park

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.The announcement was ...

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.

In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.

The announcement was a surprise at the time.

State Sen. Chip Campsen, R-Isle of Palms, told The Post and Courier in an interview this week that lawmakers only noticed the property was for sale as the window to bid was rapidly closing, and that the state’s formal offer came after that period had ended.

The state’s offer was not the highest, but it was successful, Campsen said, in part because it came without conditions that a developer might attach — like not closing until building permits are awarded.

Property records indicate the sale closed at the end of July, and the final price was $23.25 million.

The opportunity to preserve the 23-acre waterfront parcel from development, complete with views of Fort Sumter and the rest of Charleston Harbor, was a rare one, Campsen said.

He said the sisters “felt like their legacy and their stewardship of that land would be best protected, best preserved for future generations if the state bought it.”

The property will be owned by the Department of Natural Resources, which runs the marine lab next door, and managed by the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, which might one day rent out the convent building on the site.

Campsen said the 24 rooms would probably have to be expanded for future visitors.

Sam Queen, a spokeswoman for PRT, said that a public planning process for the site is expected to begin early next year.

“It definitely is a unique situation and one we’re excited about,” she said.

DNR, meanwhile, had already been doing some work near the site, cooperating with the sisters there to use oyster reefs to stabilize erosion on the waterfront, said Erin Weeks, an agency spokeswoman. Most of the parcel is forested, with a residence building and a chapel on site.

Campsen said he was excited for the planning process to incorporate the existing DNR land, and that the two parcels could be at least partially tied together into one park. It’s a historically significant area — the point at the end of Fort Johnson Road is where the first shots of the Civil War were fired on Fort Sumter.

In the meantime, nothing will change on the land any time soon. As a condition of the sale, the sisters are allowed to stay on the property through at least June 2022, with an option to extend to December 2022.

The nuns were looking to move as their members age and new women don’t join the ranks. Sister Mary Joseph Ritter confirmed that the congregation planned to relocate to the Bishop Gadsden retirement home, but the transition wouldn’t come until next year.

“We’re on the waiting list, just like everybody else,” she said.

The congregation didn’t have any further details on the move, she said, but would have more to say in the coming months about how they hope to preserve their legacy.

Twelve members remain among the Sisters of Charity, a congregation that has ministered in Charleston since 1829. Through its history, the group ran a school for free children of color in the 1840s, cared for both Union and Confederate wounded soldiers during the Civil War, and founded the hospital that would evolve into the Roper-St. Francis health care system.

The sisters moved to their current home on James Island in the 1950s.

‘Griots’ exhibit showcases fiber, traditional art at City Gallery

Griots of Cotton, Indigo and Clay, an exhibit featuring 80 pieces of art made from raw materials harvested from the earth, will go on display the week of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday at the Charleston City Gallery on Prioleau Street.Curated by Charleston quilt artist Torreah “Cookie” Washington, the exhibit includes artwork commissioned from Black fiber artists in the Lowcountry, the former slaveholding Southern states and the African Diaspora.The art is part of the permanent collection of the Black B...

Griots of Cotton, Indigo and Clay, an exhibit featuring 80 pieces of art made from raw materials harvested from the earth, will go on display the week of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday at the Charleston City Gallery on Prioleau Street.

Curated by Charleston quilt artist Torreah “Cookie” Washington, the exhibit includes artwork commissioned from Black fiber artists in the Lowcountry, the former slaveholding Southern states and the African Diaspora.

The art is part of the permanent collection of the Black Belt Justice Center in Washington, D.C. It is a growing collection. Beginning Jan. 20, the gallery will be open each Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday until Feb. 28.

The exhibit includes sweetgrass baskets, clay and indigo pieces, dolls, and fiber art, a mix of traditional and art quilts. In addition to Washington, the other Lowcountry artists are Arianne King Comer, Georgette Sanders, Virginia Watson, Lili Singleton and Carolyn Bracket.

The exhibit includes Washington’s quilt, “Yemaya: Goddess of the Sea Gives Birth to All Humankind.” It tells the story of the West African creation goddess often depicted as a mermaid. The legend states Yemaya’s womb spilled forth the 14 Yoruba goddesses and gods, and the breaking of her uterine waters caused a great flood, which created the oceans.

The Yoruba people are an ethnic group from southwestern Nigeria and southern Benin in West Africa. Yoruba territory was known as the Slave Coast, and many of the enslaved people brought to Charleston are descendants of the Yoruba people. As the legion goes, Yemaya birthed the first human woman and man, who became the parents of all mortal beings on earth.

“Ever since the time Black slaves first arrived in the South Carolina Lowcountry in 1670, they brought with them the stories of the ocean and river goddesses,” Washington said. “They carried the stories in their hearts and heads.

“Black fiber artisans uphold the charge of griots, weaving together narratives of resistance into tactile expressions of land memory and visions for the future,” she said.

Another quilt, “Bill of Sale,” tells the story of one branch of the United Martin Family, whose 9,000 family members worldwide trace their ancestry to Trasie, a 17-year-old girl from Cameroon, who was sold into slavery in Charleston. According to a bill of sale, Trasie was sold for $300 on Dec. 17, 1799, to Fairfield County planter John Martin. “Bill of Sale,” created by Northville, Michigan, quilt artist Toya R.B. Thomas, shows the descendants of one branch of the Martin family in Virginia.

Charleston resident Montez Martin said, “As a fifth generation member of the United Martin Family, it gives me great pride to have the family quilt and other materials displayed in the city of the family’s American origin. Tracie, our enslaved ancestor, disembarked in Charleston, was sold twice, then transported to Fairfield County. There began the United Martin Family over 220 years ago.”

As part of this exhibit members of the Return of the Bees Collective will participate in a social justice quilting bee from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 29 at McLeod Plantation on James Island.

City Gallery guests are asked to reserve free tickets for timed admission into the gallery in advance of their visit. Tickets can be reserved online or by calling the gallery at (843) 958-6484 during normal business hours. Because of the city’s COVID-19 safety protocols, all visitors will be required to wear masks.

Commentary: Make I-526 from Johns to James island a buses-only highway

The S.C. Department of Transportation has released detailed information about the planned Interstate 526 extension, and everybody who wants to be in the discussion should first study it. When I learned that Johns Island is expected to triple its population between 2015 and 2050, my initially favorable view of this project changed.The highway extension by itself is only a partial solution. Once built, it would trigger the widening of roads all over the area. The monetary and environmental costs of those roads appear nowhere in the othe...

The S.C. Department of Transportation has released detailed information about the planned Interstate 526 extension, and everybody who wants to be in the discussion should first study it. When I learned that Johns Island is expected to triple its population between 2015 and 2050, my initially favorable view of this project changed.

The highway extension by itself is only a partial solution. Once built, it would trigger the widening of roads all over the area. The monetary and environmental costs of those roads appear nowhere in the otherwise diligent impact study. We have arrived at a waypoint where we must question uncontrolled growth based on car traffic and become serious about public transportation.

The region has made a promising start with the Lowcountry Rapid Transit project. However, the low densities on James and Johns islands call for a different concept: multiple lines of smaller buses branching out into these islands. But how can these buses get there without being stuck in car traffic? The I-526 extension presents a one-time chance to achieve this through these steps:

• Build the I-526 extension as proposed in Alternative G with four lanes between West Ashley and Johns Island. This section of the highway is badly needed to connect Johns Island with destinations north and would reduce congestion on Main Road and Maybank Highway on James Island.

• Continue the extension to James Island and S.C. 30 as a two-lane bus road, accompanied by a bike and pedestrian path. If this section is built for car traffic, it will have a disproportionate impact on neighborhoods and the James Island County Park while bringing ever more cars into the city where parking is already scarce. As a green corridor, serving electric buses and bikers, it would be quiet and improve access to the park.

• Make future development on the islands conditional on improving bus service. Establish small park-and-ride lots where the bus lines connect to developments. As bus traffic increases, reserve two lanes on I-526 and S.C. 30 for “green” traffic.

In its study for the I-526 extension, the Department of Transportation does not mention buses or public transportation. This is the mindset of the 1970s, when road planning destroyed the urban fabric of cities and made them dependent on individual car traffic.

Perpetuated today, it is an astonishing denial of the challenges that are posed by climate change. It also constitutes social injustice toward residents on the islands who cannot drive cars because of their age or lack of monetary means.

Electric cars will not reduce congestion. Autonomous cars will increase demand and make it much worse. Future development on the islands is acceptable only if a significant amount of commuting can be served by public transportation. The I-526 extension offers a unique chance to do so.

Reinhold Roedig of Wadmalaw Island is a retired city planner from Germany who specialized in urban renewal.

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