Criminal Defense Attorney in Hilton Head Island, SC

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Fighting For You

When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients' cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring - a criminal defense attorney on Hilton Head Island, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

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Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC

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Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in Hilton Head Island

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry's history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of Hilton Head Island's legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in Hilton Head Island, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system's ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in Hilton Head Island:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In Hilton Head Island, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney's role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime - a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Hilton Head Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Hilton Head Island, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC
Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC

Criminal Case Timeline In Hilton Head Island, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in Hilton Head Island, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone - most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of Hilton Head Island's criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in Hilton Head Island, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant's acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in Hilton Head Island, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Criminal Defense Attorney Hilton Head Island, SC

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a "count." During this phase, the State will gather a "grand jury" comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant's case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor's job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client's innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution's case.

Typically, a trial in Hilton Head Island includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State's Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense's Case
  • The State's Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in Hilton Head Island, SC

Black Friday hours for 22 major retailers to help SC shoppers maximize their shopping savings

Now that Thanksgiving is here, it’s time to move on to the next holiday.No, not Christmas. Not yet.One of America’s favorite unofficial holidays is back — Black Friday.Black Friday shopping has mostly evolved from inciting midnight madness.Now, numerous retailers have been advertising Black Friday deals throughout November. Rather than promoting late night deals on Thanksgiving, retailers are choosing to give their employees time with their family during the holiday and now opt to open early Frid...

Now that Thanksgiving is here, it’s time to move on to the next holiday.

No, not Christmas. Not yet.

One of America’s favorite unofficial holidays is back — Black Friday.

Black Friday shopping has mostly evolved from inciting midnight madness.

Now, numerous retailers have been advertising Black Friday deals throughout November. Rather than promoting late night deals on Thanksgiving, retailers are choosing to give their employees time with their family during the holiday and now opt to open early Friday morning.

Yet, for many, the thrill and enjoyment of running to the nearest mall or local shopping center hours after Thanksgiving dinner is a family tradition and personal favorite.

Most Bath & Body Works locations will open at 6 a.m.

Check with your local Bath & Body Works to confirm their Black Friday hours. Locations in malls, outlets and free-standing stores may have different opening times. Some of these locations have reported to open at 5 a.m.

Will be open from 5 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Will be open from 6 a.m. until 10 p.m.

Will be open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Will be open from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Will be open from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m.

Will be open from 6 a.m. until 10 p.m.

Hours vary by location. Check with your local retailer.

Will open at 6 a.m.

Will be open from 8 a.m. until 9 p.m.

Will be open during normal store hours (6 a.m. to 9 p.m.)

Will be open from 7 a.m. until 10 p.m.

Hours vary by location. Check with your local retailer. Many report to be open from 5 a.m. until 11 p.m.

Will be open from 7 a.m. until 9 p.m.

Will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Will be open from 6 a.m. until 9 p.m. Doorbusters sale will be from 6 a.m. to noon.

Will open at 9 a.m. in most locations and close at normal time.

Varies by location. Many report normal store hours (8 a.m. until 10 p.m.)

Will be open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Stores will reportedly be open during normal hours (6 a.m. to 11 p.m.)

Hours vary by location. Check with your local retailer.

Varies by location. Many report normal store hours (8 a.m. to 9 p.m.)

Scammers target Beaufort County elderly as residents report hundreds of thousands in losses

Elderly residents in Beaufort County reported they have been swindled out of thousands in November after investigators saw scam attempts pick up over the summer, according to the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office.There have been at least five complaints in the last month to the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office of scams targeting bank accounts in which scammers pose as bank representatives or employees from fundraising platforms.In total, the reports reached $159,418 so far, Master Sgt. Eric Calendine said. with the S...

Elderly residents in Beaufort County reported they have been swindled out of thousands in November after investigators saw scam attempts pick up over the summer, according to the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office.

There have been at least five complaints in the last month to the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office of scams targeting bank accounts in which scammers pose as bank representatives or employees from fundraising platforms.

In total, the reports reached $159,418 so far, Master Sgt. Eric Calendine said. with the Sheriff’s Office’s Southern Investigations team.

In one case, on Nov. 8, a bank employee reported that an 86-year-old man was told by a scammer pretending to be a representative from ActBlue, an actual online fundraising platform for Democratic political campaigns, that he would be able to meet President Joe Biden in exchange for $24,296.

In other cases, a woman on Hilton Head was tricked into making a $78,350 wire transfer to a company called Excell Transportation, while a 67-year-old man, also on Hilton Head, had $34,820 taken from three bank accounts.

Among the most common scams seen in Beaufort County, said Calendine, are computer and bank scams where scammers will pretend a person’s computer has been infected with a virus to target their personal information or call pretending to be a bank representative to say their account is at risk.

“We are a target-rich environment in the sense of retirees,” Calendine said.

Once or twice a year, said Sheriff’s Office spokesperson Maj. Angela Viens, the area will see scammers posing as deputies telling people they have missed jury duty or have a debt to pay to the agency and will tell them to do so using gift cards.

“We’ve had people box up $30,000 in a shoe box and FedEx it [to scammers],” she said. “We have been very proactive to educate people, especially the aging population because they fall victim to it so often.”

During Hurricane Ian, two different groups targeted Beaufort County by stealing people’s mail and “washing checks,” Calendine said. They do this by using chemicals to remove the handwritten recipient names on checks or altering the payment amount before depositing the money.

“A lot of people don’t report it because they’re embarrassed,” Calendine said.

The reports are a common occurrence, Calendine said.

Over the summer, scammers attempted to get $889,100 via wire transfers from 15 accounts linked to Beaufort County residents. In actuality, $589,000 was stolen after police were able to intercept the money.

“This goes on every day and, in most cases, you can’t get it back,” Calendine said.

In June, a Hilton Head woman was the victim of a romance scam and lost over $150,000, the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office announced in a Facebook post that month.

A Hilton Head woman reported to police in July that she had been scammed out of $130,000 by two men claiming to be agents with the CIA. The woman ultimately handed over her money to the fake agents at a Hardeeville Walmart.

In September, a 77-year-old woman in Beaufort lost over $800,000 after becoming the target of scammers who told her she would have to buy gold to protect her assets after her account had been hacked.

“They use fear of my account has been hacked ... to go after you,” Calendine said. “[They] make you do what they want you to do. It goes on and on.”

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission warns that the telltale signs of a scammer will be someone calling who pressures you to act immediately before you can verify what they said. Below are steps you can take to protect yourself from potential scams.

Anyone who thinks they have been the victim of a scam or fraud may call their local police department or submit a tip to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at: https://www.ic3.gov/.

The untold story of the Hilton Head man killed on his bicycle

Editorials and other Opinion content offer perspectives on issues important to our community and are independent from the work of our newsroom reporters.Alvin Singleton seemed to live on his bicycle, and he died on his bicycle Nov. 6.The S.C. Highway Patrol says he was killed in a hit-and-run accident late that Sunday night on Palmetto Parkway on the north end of Hilton Head Island.His ...

Editorials and other Opinion content offer perspectives on issues important to our community and are independent from the work of our newsroom reporters.

Alvin Singleton seemed to live on his bicycle, and he died on his bicycle Nov. 6.

The S.C. Highway Patrol says he was killed in a hit-and-run accident late that Sunday night on Palmetto Parkway on the north end of Hilton Head Island.

His death at age 67 shook his classmates in the H.E. McCracken High School class of 1973, where he was a star athlete who made good grades.

And it saddened the directors of two of the island’s social services agencies who treasure framed self-portraits that Singleton made photocopies of and sold for $5.

The Rev. Nannette Pierson, founder and director of the Sandalwood Community Food Pantry on Hilton Head, said, “Alvin Singleton was a big part of our Pantry family. Alvin arrived on his bicycle every Tuesday and when I would tell him, ‘Alvin, I love you no matter what!’ he would cry, and when I prayed he would just soften into the sweetest soul.”

Sandy Gillis, director of the Deep Well Project, said, “My guess is many, many people have seen Alvin, maybe talked to him, maybe were asked by Alvin if they could spare a dollar.

“Alvin covered the north end of Hilton Head on foot and on his bike like it was his premier sales territory. He’d visit Deep Well and ask for a soda, some hot dogs, and some bread, preferably sliced bread with no seeds.

“One time we had a big slice of yellow cake with chocolate frosting to share with Alvin. He was so happy to see that cake in his ‘travel food bag’ that he sat right down on the bench by Deep Well’s front door and proceeded to devour that big slice of cake in one sitting. He declared it very good cake.”

Singleton lived on his mother’s property off Marshland Road.

His sister Vernie said his life was complicated, and a source of both pride and frustration to the family.

It also was a life of hidden gems, and great promise.

Alvin Singleton was from one of Hilton Head’s oldest and most prominent families.

His great-great-grandfather, Namen Singleton, spent the first 12 years of his life in slavery, but started an inspiring legacy of land ownership and entrepreneurship on a remote Hilton Head.

Namen’s son Ezekiel was “able to envision the great potential that the land possessed,” according to a history of the family published in 2016 by Hilton Head Monthly magazine. “Having the forethought of its value as well as location, they developed the beach front property (in the area now known as Singleton Beach), and built pavilions as well as the Sand Dunes store, drawing Black people from as far away as Atlanta, Charleston and Savannah to the waterfront for entertainment and relaxation.”

Alvin was the son of Diogenese and Dorothy Singleton, who ran an Amoco service station on William Hilton Parkway in the Chaplin community, long before the Four Seasons Resort was built across the road.

“In 1943, a young Diogenese Singleton began a life dedicated to education and progress in a wooden rowboat bound for ninth grade at Penn School on St. Helena Island,” The Island Packet reported in a front-page story when he died in 2002.

Diogenese was a teacher at the three-room Robinson Junior High on Beach City Road, and then Michael C. Riley High School in Bluffton.

He was a mentor, philosopher, and great thinker who wrote frequent provocative letters to the editor. He also was a farmer on Hilton Head, specializing in peaches and pigs.

“Many of us used Mr. Singleton as our stabilizer,” said Thomas C. Barnwell Jr. “He was always available to give us good advice. There is no replacement for him.”

Vernie Singleton said they did not realize the impact his father’s passing would have on her brother.

Ted Whitaker, the legendary track and field coach of Hilton Head and Bluffton, put Alvin Singleton in the highest echelon of athletes to ever come from this community.

In describing the great athlete Charles Kidd, Whitaker told me in 1978, “We’ve had a lot of athletes here, but Charles is right up there with the Joe Greenes and the Alvin Singletons.”

Singleton was 5-foot-8 and 160 pounds at the most, but so fast and quick that in his junior and senior seasons at McCracken High, he threw 13 touchdown passes, scored 16 touchdowns, returned six punts or kickoffs for touchdowns, and intercepted 26 passes.

Those were glory days for the Bulldogs, with Singleton at quarterback and running backs Michael Cohen and Henry Mervin behind him. On the line was one of the all-time best in Martin Govan.

In track, Singleton once ran the 100-yard-dash in 10.1 seconds.

He ran the second leg on a state champion 880-relay team, with George Powell, Mervin and anchor Mike Cohen.

He was the school’s first player selected by coaches to play in North-South all-star football game in Columbia, and the only player on the South team from a Class A school, the state’s smallest classification.

And he earned a four-year full scholarship to play wide receiver at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, North Carolina.

His parents did get to go see him play. But he did not finish school.

Alvin Singleton also was an artist.

He learned a good bit from two professors in Western Carolina’s large art department.

When Singleton had an exhibition of 11 paintings at the Hilton Head Library in 1978, the show was reviewed by longtime Packet art critic and accomplished artist Kathryn Hodgman.

Singleton told her his professors allowed students to work out their own ideas.

“But, according to Alvin, ‘they did not get into color.’ Alvin certainly did,” Hodgman wrote. “These are free and vivid in color interpretation: purple skies, red suns, brilliant greens.

“They are vigorous, original and inventive.”

Titles included “The Port Royal Cannon Base,” “Palmetto Dunes,” and “Mid-Atlantic Beach.”

“Alvin did, indeed ‘get into color’ in many of them,” Hodgman wrote. “He is free in his interpretations, with brick-colored skies covered with billowing white clouds outlined in gray; with bright orange beaches; with blue and black water patterns.”

She said Alvin Singleton the artist was discovered by a family friend, Virginia Kiah of Savannah, a portrait painter whose work has been shown in the United States Capitol.

She opened The Kiah Museum in 1959 in her mother’s home, dedicated to her mother’s role in civil rights activism, and was a board member of the Savannah College of Art and Design, which named Kiah Hall for her in a historic building that formerly housed the SCAD Museum of Art.

Singleton apparently sold all of his art, and a friend of the family is now trying to piece together a collection.

Sandy Gillis at Deep Well said she told Singleton when she purchased a copy of his self-portrait that his use of color reminded her of the work of Beaufort County native Jonathan Green.

She said, “Alvin could be a challenge. While he was physically pretty small, he was tough and wiry – and could be a little scary when he was agitated.

“But I’m going to choose to remember Alvin the way he was that day he found the giant piece of chocolate cake in his bag … a wide smile, with a few teeth missing, and delight dancing in his eyes.

“Rest in peace, Alvin.”

‘We’re really just scratching the surface’: Fisherman tags great whites off Hilton Head

Christmas is coming early for Chip Michalove.It’s in the form of hundred of pounds to tons in weight. Thousands of razor-sharp teeth. And a signature pointed dorsal fine. That’s right, as the waters cool and the holidays are upon us, great white sharks are swimming down from the northeast to South Carolina waters.For Michalove, a Hilton Head Island charter captain who owns Outcast Sport Fishing, it’s the best gift he could ask for. And if...

Christmas is coming early for Chip Michalove.

It’s in the form of hundred of pounds to tons in weight. Thousands of razor-sharp teeth. And a signature pointed dorsal fine. That’s right, as the waters cool and the holidays are upon us, great white sharks are swimming down from the northeast to South Carolina waters.

For Michalove, a Hilton Head Island charter captain who owns Outcast Sport Fishing, it’s the best gift he could ask for. And if his prediction holds, because of the earlier-than-normal cold waters, this great white season could shape up to be one for the books.

He’s aiming to tag and release 10-15 of the apex predators during the season that typically runs through March, though he’s had a couple stragglers in April. At the top of his list is reeling in 16 or 17-footer, which would topple the typical 10- to 12-foot sharks the captain usually tags. For reference, Michalove’s boat is 26 feet and a mammoth 16-foot shark would tip the scales at about 3,000 pounds.

The next couple of months will be a bitter-cold waiting game to see whether he gets his wish, but if temperatures around Hilton Head continue to plummet, Michalove said it’s shaping up that he could tag an “enormous one” off the coast.

From satellite tags Michalove and others have placed on the great whites, he watched as the majority barreled up to New England and Canada this summer to feast on a buffet of seals and whales. As the waters get colder, the massive fish make their way to Carolina, Georgia and Florida seas.

“They’re all in transition right now,” Michalove said. “(For the next two weeks) the Atlantic Ocean looks like I-95 on Thanksgiving weekend.”

The more sharks, the better. That’s right. It’s not what most laymen would think, but the influx of white sharks in recent years means the area waters are healthier. And when Michalove affixes thousands of dollars worth of tags to one of the gigantic fish, scientists can glean from them vital data points.

Biologists with whom Michalove works, like the “shark godfather” Greg Skomal with the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries, can track information from the shark’s movements to the saltiness of water the fish prefer. The Hilton Head captain also works with the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy.

Not even a decade ago was information available about great whites visiting Hilton Head.

“We’re just really scratching the surface on what we can learn from these fish down here,” Michalove said. “We’re starting to learn what they’re doing here and why.”

Reese was the last great white Michalove caught, tagged and released. That was back in late-March, as the species was heading northward. The 9-year-old female fish was 10 feet long, nearly a whopping 1,000 pounds and gave the well-known “shark whisperer” a good run around.

Michalove acknowledges that if someone wants to hop on a charter with him to seek a great white in the coming months, it’s going to be a freezing cold ride, what he called “the most miserable day of your life until one shows up.”

“And then you could die tomorrow,” he added.

There’s no question in his mind, the wait and the fight to catch, tag and release a great white is worth it.

The next few weeks, as the fish continue to swim south, he’ll have his senses on alert for 16- to 17-foot apex predators. But for now, as Michalove puts it, “we’re just starting the first inning.”

Community Thanksgiving meal serving up fun and fellowship on Hilton Head Island

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. (WSAV) — Hilton Head Island is usually popular with tourists year-round, but on Thanksgiving people come from all over the area and the nation for one reason, turkey.The bird was served up with fun and fellowship at the Community Thanksgiving Dinner at Hudson’s.Gloria and Allen LaCoe and some of their friends started the meal as a way to bring folks together on the holiday who might be lonely.Twenty-three years later, more than 1,600 people come to the Island on the holiday for a feas...

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. (WSAV) — Hilton Head Island is usually popular with tourists year-round, but on Thanksgiving people come from all over the area and the nation for one reason, turkey.

The bird was served up with fun and fellowship at the Community Thanksgiving Dinner at Hudson’s.

Gloria and Allen LaCoe and some of their friends started the meal as a way to bring folks together on the holiday who might be lonely.

Twenty-three years later, more than 1,600 people come to the Island on the holiday for a feast, and so much more.

Andrew Carmines has run this Hudson’s Seafood on the Dock’s for more than a dozen years, but this year is a little bit special. He has enlisted some help from his two daughters, Millie and Alice–working right next to dad.

“They always wonder where dad is on Thanksgiving and now they know,” said Carmines.

Millie and Alice Carmines added, “It makes people happy. And they talk to the community and make new friends.”

“We will see how it goes. Maybe one year in the not-too-distant future I can take off a little early,” Carmines said.

The tables are set up family-style. You may be sitting next to a friend or family member, or a stranger who will then be passing you ham, turkey and all the trimmings.

It has become an event that people from across the state will put on their calendars every year not just for the good food, but for the people.

“This is such a great a great area for the community,” says Gloria LaCoe. “It’s a sense of community the island itself. We do reach beyond the Island, Bluffton, and Beaufort and people come from Savannah. It is a day where we can really give thanks for being here.”

Hudson’s staff takes days to cook up the dozens of turkeys, ham and side dishes and then a team of 350 volunteers serves up the meal to all comers.

The food is free, but the event does benefit three local charities, Bluffton Self Help, Deep Well and Second Helpings. So donations are happily accepted.

The Lima family isn’t going anywhere.

This is their first year volunteering and Mom says it won’t be their last.

“If you start them early then it will stay with them and hopefully when I am sitting at the table they will be serving me. that’s the idea,” Volunteer Alena Lima told WSAV News 3.

The best idea for everyone here is to enjoy the food and enjoy every moment together.

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