Criminal Defense Attorney in Greenville, SC

Let’s Talk About Your Case!

Client Logo

Fighting For You

When you are charged with a crime or are involved in an accident, it can seem like the world is crashing down around you. Between the threat of incarceration and the chance of financial loss, these foreboding situations often feel overwhelming. Friends and family cut ties, your employer threatens termination, and life seems hopeless. It is imperative to have a fighter on your side during these trying times: one that will stick with you through thick and thin, without any judgments.

Welcome to the Law Office of Richard Waring: where defending your rights and freedoms is paramount in securing your future.

Richard implements a powerfully simple yet effective model for all his clients’ cases:

  • The Relentless Pursuit of a Positive Outcome
  • The Use of Creative Problem-Solving Tactics
  • Excellent Communication

When you are ready to fight back against the allegations against you, it is time to call the Law Office of Richard Waring – a criminal defense attorney on Greenville, SC, with the knowledge, experience, and drive to defend you during your most difficult time.

Service Areas

criminal defense handcuff

What Clients Say About Us

Richard Waring

From Prosecution to Protecting Your Rights in Greenville

Richard Waring began his commitment to community service years ago. As a young man, he would spend his summers volunteering his time to help needy communities.

As an adult, his desire to help others manifested itself while I served as a prosecutor for "close to 10 years."?. During this time, he would take part in some of the most difficult trials in the Lowcountry’s history. He prosecuted thousands of individuals for crimes such as assault and battery, armed robbery, drug crimes, DUI, financial crimes, and even murder.
His time as a prosecutor was priceless, giving him valuable insight and knowledge into the inner workings of Greenville’s legal system. Today, Richard uses that experience to vigorously defend good, hardworking men and women whose freedoms are only one judgment away from disappearing.
Whether you made a mistake and need a second chance or have been wrongfully accused of a crime, you need a professional who has put in time on both sides. At the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest easy knowing this former prosecutor will fight tooth and nail for your freedom.

Criminal Defense

When you are charged with a crime, it can become a horrible experience. The range of emotions one goes through can be taxing: embarrassment, humiliation, regret, sadness, despair. The domino effect that often happens when charged with a crime can be awful, as well: loss of job, abandonment by your family or significant other, dirty looks from those in your community.

Fortunately, a criminal defense attorney in Greenville, SC, can help restore your reputation and repair your life. In times of legal crises, your friends and family may cut ties, but Richard Waring will be on your side from the time you call his office to the time your case is resolved.

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in South Carolina, Richard has a set of skills and experiences; assets that have guided him to win criminal cases against the government. Richard truly knows the criminal justice system’s ins and outs and is dedicated to fighting for his clients to achieve the best possible outcome on their criminal cases.

While some cases result in a positive outcome quickly, others must go to trial. Much like a combat athlete trains for months, hones his or her skills, and goes to war with an opponent, Richard Waring has prepared for and battled it out in many high-profile trials.

When you trust the Law Office of Richard Waring, you can rest assured that you are in capable hands. Each of our criminal defense clients receives the following when entrusting Richard Waring as their criminal defense lawyer in Greenville:

  • Vigorous representation
  • Quick response to emails and phone calls
  • Compassionate, understanding treatment
  • You will never be treated as unimportant or second-rate
  • Thorough investigation for your case
  • All of your constitutional rights, including the right to a fair trial, upheld
  • Notifications of important updates

The following are common cases that Richard Waring can handle for you:

  • Misdemeanor DUI/DWI
  • Felony DUI/DWI
  • Violent Crimes including: Assault and Battery of a High and Aggravated Nature, Assault and Battery, Attempted Murder, and Murder
  • Strong Armed Robbery
  • Armed Robbery
  • Drug Crimes
  • Manufacturing of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Distribution of Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Possession with Intent to Distribute Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Heroin, Crack, or Cocaine
  • Gun crimes including: pointing or present a firearm, possession of a pistol with obliterated serial numbers, possession of a stolen pistol
  • Restoration of Your Gun Rights
  • Trespassing
  • Larceny and Burglary
  • Property Crimes
  • Domestic Violence
  • Shoplifting
  • Financial Crimes including: Forgery, financial transaction card theft, fake IDs, breach of trust, obtaining goods by false pretenses
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Minor in Possession of Alcohol
  • Traffic Crimes including: driving without a license, speeding, reckless or careless driving
Criminal Defense
Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In Greenville, SC

Importance Of Your Criminal Defense Attorney In Greenville, SC

There are several key players in the criminal justice system, each with its own roles. The prosecutor is tasked with enforcing laws and convicting offenders. The judge serves as an unbiased decision-maker. The criminal defense attorney’s role is to protect the rights of the individual who is charged with a crime – a vitally important role in the criminal justice world.

Having a proactive, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side almost always improves your chance of a positive outcome. While their primary role is to defend your rights and protect you from excessive sentences, they have many other duties.

When you entrust Richard Waring as your defense advocate, he will fight to protect your rights throughout the case by:

  • Arguing in court to reduce how much you must pay to post bail
  • Being present during police interrogations and interviews
  • Discovering and applying potent legal defenses
  • Advising you on your decision to plead guilty, not guilty, or to go to trial (if applicable)
  • Explaining the implications of pleading guilty
  • Gathering evidence and interviewing witnesses relating to the allegations against you
  • Meticulously examining the circumstance surrounding your search and arrest (if applicable) to uncover Fourth Amendment violations
  • Meticulously examining any drug or DUI-related chemical tests to ensure accuracy and uncover errors
  • Representing you during scheduled hearings
  • Representing you during a jury trial
  • Working with the prosecutor to discuss plea deals or the possibility of a reduced sentence
  • If convicted, representing you during the sentencing phase and arguing on your behalf for a fair sentence

Knowing Your Rights

As a defendant, you have important rights. Some of the rights that Richard Waring will fight to protect on your behalf are:

  • The right to a speedy trial
  • The right to remain silent
  • The right against unreasonable seizures and searches
  • The right against unreasonable searches and seizures
  • The right against cruel and unusual punishment
  • In most cases, the right to a jury trial
  • The right of innocence until proven guilty
  • The right to legal representation

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Greenville, the government must supply you with a public defender.

While United States law does not mandate that a defense attorney be assigned to a defendant, the prosecutor must uphold your right to legal representation. If you cannot afford an attorney in Greenville, the government must supply you with a public defender.

Knowing Your Rights
Knowing Your Rights

Criminal Case Timeline In Greenville, SC

If you or a member of your family is facing criminal charges in Greenville, there is no doubt that you are anxious about the road ahead. You are not alone – most of our criminal defense clients worry about the uncertainties surrounding the legal process and what is next in their case.

At the Law Office of Richard Waring, we empathize with this stress, and as such, make every effort to address anxiety-inducing questions like:

  • How long will it take for my case to be resolved?
  • What type of sentence is common for the crime in which I am being accused?
  • Will the prosecutor offer me a favorable plea deal?

We cannot answer these questions in detail until we have time to review your case and speak with you one-on-one. Until that time, this high-level view of Greenville’s criminal case timeline can offer some insight into what lies ahead.

Arrest And Investigation

Arrest and Investigation

This is the first step in the criminal case timeline. During this time, police officer(s) will investigate the potential crime at hand and arrest whomever the officer(s) believes to be responsible. At this point, the person in question is considered a Defendant.

Initial Bond Setting

Initial Bond Setting

Shortly after the arrest (typically within the same day), defendants are granted an initial bond hearing. This short proceeding determines whether a defendant will be released from jail while charges are pending. It is wise to hire a criminal defense lawyer in Greenville, SC, before this hearing so that they may argue on your behalf.

Preliminary Hearing

Preliminary Hearing

The purpose of the preliminary hearing is to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence (or probable cause) for the case to carry on. Defendants must request this hearing within 20 days of their initial bond setting. Hearings typically commence within three to six weeks. It is especially important that defendants retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney at this stage.

Initial Appearance

Initial Appearance

The main purpose of this court date is to determine if the defendant has hired an attorney or will need a public defender appointed to them. If you have an attorney before this hearing, defendants are not required to be present. The initial appearance typically happens 45 days after the arrest.

Plea Offers

Plea Offers

n some cases, the State may offer a plea offer to the defendant. If the defendant accepts this deal, a hearing will be scheduled to finalize the defendant’s acceptance. If the defendant pleads guilty, they are typically sentenced on the spot. If the defendant rejects the plea, he or she may have to go before the judge to ensure they understand the consequences of rejecting a plea offer.

Discovery

Discovery

Under Rule 5 of the South Carolina Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant will receive all evidence that will be used against them. As your criminal defense attorneys in Greenville, we will submit a written request to the court to obtain this information. It may take the State weeks or months to turn over their evidence, especially if that evidence is new.

Indictment

Indictment

The first barrier for the State to prosecute takes place during the preliminary hearing. The second occurs during the indictment phase. In general terms, an indictment is a document that details the criminal charges which the defendant must face. Each crime listed on the indictment is called a “count.” During this phase, the State will gather a “grand jury” comprised of public citizens. This jury is presented with evidence to help them approve or disapprove of the charges contained in the indictment. If the indictment is approved, the defendant’s case will proceed to trial. If it is rejected, charges are usually dropped.

Trial

During the trial, both the defense and prosecution will present evidence to a jury, who will hand down a final verdict. The prosecutor’s job during the trial is to convince the jury, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the defendant is guilty. The defendant is under no obligation to prove anything. As an experienced criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor, Richard Waring will work hard to convince the jury of his client’s innocence while pointing out holes in the prosecution’s case.

Typically, a trial in Greenville includes the following phases:

  • Jury Selection
  • Pre-Trial Motions
  • Opening Statements
  • The State’s Case
  • Directed Verdict
  • The Defense’s Case
  • The State’s Rebuttal
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions and Deliberation
  • Verdict and Sentencing

Latest News in Greenville

Winter storm Warning: Parts of Upstate should prepare for damaging ice storm

A Winter Storm Warning is now in effect from Saturday night to Sunday night, according to the National Weather Service's latest forecast Friday afternoon.The National Weather Service called for less snow accumulation and more ice for parts of the Upstate this weekend. Snow totals have dropped for South Carolina and in return more ice is expected, according to the weather services' latest forecast at 11 a.m. Friday.Two to five inches of sleet, snow and ice are expected in South Carolina and ice accumulations of on...

A Winter Storm Warning is now in effect from Saturday night to Sunday night, according to the National Weather Service's latest forecast Friday afternoon.

The National Weather Service called for less snow accumulation and more ice for parts of the Upstate this weekend. Snow totals have dropped for South Carolina and in return more ice is expected, according to the weather services' latest forecast at 11 a.m. Friday.

Two to five inches of sleet, snow and ice are expected in South Carolina and ice accumulations of one quarter to one half inch with light sleet and snow accumulations are expected with winds gusting as high as 35 mph.

Travel could be nearly impossible across the entire area. At least scattered power outages and tree damage are likely across the Piedmont due to the ice as well as gusty winds, according to National Weather Service's Winter Storm Warning.

Black ice could be a problem each morning early next week, the weather service said.

Late Friday afternoon, Gov. Henry McMaster declared a state of emergency for this weekend's winter storm and urged residents to monitor local weather conditions and take safety precautions.

"South Carolina will be impacted by a major winter storm this weekend," McMaster said in a press release. "There is a potential for very dangerous conditions caused by accumulations of ice and snow, which will likely result in power outages across the state."

The executive order puts into place the state's emergency plan in place that coordinates resources between state agencies.

Greenville County and Spartanburg County are now expected to see a total ice accumulation of 0.1 to 0.25 inches while Anderson County is expected to see 0.25 to 0.5 inches of ice, according to the National Weather Service.

Greenville, Spartanburg and Anderson were highlighted in red on a weather service map. Areas highlighted in red should prepare for a damaging ice storm, according to the weather service.

Conditions:Certain roads are being prepared for a winter storm in SC. Here's what will happen where

With extreme weather like ice and freezing rain, Laurens Electric Cooperative is planning for potential widespread outages. The co-op has prepared extra supplies, has crews on stand-by and has emergency call-center capabilities in case of widespread outages.

The co-op currently has 100 additional personnel on stand-by with staff and line crews on-call 24 hours a day to work on any outages, according to the co-op.

Duke Energy has service crew workers, line technicians and other storm personnel available across service regions to respond to power outages that may occur this weekend.

Depending on the impact of the weather, Duke Energy can bring in additional workers from its Southeast utilities and/or activate mutual aid agreements to enlist help from other utilities across the United States.

Check back for more on this developing story.

The Greenville News is providing this important information about the winter storm free of charge. Please remember that your subscriptions to The News help us to provide this and more important journalism to our community. Thank you for reading, and please consider buying a subscription. For information, visit greenvilleonline.com/subscribe.

Tamia Boyd is a Michigan native who covers breaking news in Greenville. Email her at tboyd@gannett.com, and follow her on Twitter @tamiamb.

Certain roads are being prepared for a winter storm in SC. Here's what will happen where

Local, county and state officials are preparing to keep roads clear and as safe as possible in the event of a winter storm this weekend.While Greenville County officials do not pretreat roads because much of the high-travel roadway in the county is owned and maintained by the South Carolina Department of Transportation, they will identify risks and prepare to respond in the hours before the storm is forecast to arrive late Saturday, according to county government spokesperson Bob Mihalic.Officials with the city o...

Local, county and state officials are preparing to keep roads clear and as safe as possible in the event of a winter storm this weekend.

While Greenville County officials do not pretreat roads because much of the high-travel roadway in the county is owned and maintained by the South Carolina Department of Transportation, they will identify risks and prepare to respond in the hours before the storm is forecast to arrive late Saturday, according to county government spokesperson Bob Mihalic.

Officials with the city of Greenville are preparing a salt-brine mixture to try to prevent accumulation of ice on city roads. City government spokesperson Beth Brotherton said Greenville's public-works department will make decisions on what preparation is necessary where in the hours to come.

Officials at the state Department of Transportation, meanwhile, planned to begin anti-icing pretreatments on priority roads and bridges as early as Thursday in areas like Greenville with the highest probability for frozen precipitation.

Accumulating snow in the forecast:Snow is forecast for SC as confidence grows, but wintry mix could come in winter storm

The move is part of the SCDOT's winter-storm operations plan to counter a worst-case scenario of conditions, according to a press release emailed Wednesday.

Workers began mixing salt brine and loading it into trucks for pretreatment applications on Wednesday, according to SCDOT spokesperson Pete Poore.

The department has 2,500 employees, 60,000 tons of salt, 275,000 gallons of ice-breaking chemicals and more than 525,000 gallons of salt brine ready across the state, according to Poore.

Salt brine is a solution of salt and water that has a lower freezing point than water, making it a tool to remove snow and ice from roads.

De-icing materials are to continue being applied during the storm as conditions warrant, and plowing operations will commence, officials said, with personnel and equipment shifting from non-impacted areas to areas of need and working in shifts 24 hours a day.

The department's priority roads and bridges consist of interstates and routes that are essential to the movement of traffic, many of which service emergency facilities.

Aside from Interstate 85, Interstate 385 and Interstate 185, high-travel roads in Greenville County include:

You can find out what roads are managed by SCDOT or a local municipality through SCDOT's road finder on its website.

Of course, in the event of severe winter weather, avoiding travel in the first place, when possible, is always advisable.

"We hope people don't go out and drive in this mess," Poore said.

Check back for more on this developing story.

Genna Contino covers Greenville County and housing for The Greenville News. Contact Genna at gcontino@gannett.com or on Twitter @GennaContino. Subscribe to The Greenville News at greenvillenews.com/subscribe.

'Scary': COVID hospitalizations reach new high at Prisma Health amid omicron surge in SC

Prisma Health is seeing its highest number of hospitalizations in South Carolina yet due to omicron, a variant of COVID-19 that has broken records for positive tests across the U.S.Though omicron is less malignant than the delta variant, Prisma Health infectious disease doctors said their hospitals are becoming overwhelmed with more people sick.Omicron is the most contagious variant yet, and the unvaccinated represent the vast majority of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.On Thursday, South Carolina's state h...

Prisma Health is seeing its highest number of hospitalizations in South Carolina yet due to omicron, a variant of COVID-19 that has broken records for positive tests across the U.S.

Though omicron is less malignant than the delta variant, Prisma Health infectious disease doctors said their hospitals are becoming overwhelmed with more people sick.

Omicron is the most contagious variant yet, and the unvaccinated represent the vast majority of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

On Thursday, South Carolina's state health department reported 10,412 cases, and that doesn't include residents who took at-home COVID tests. More than a quarter of those tested were positive.

Dr. Wendell James, Prisma Health's incident commander, described the data as "breathtaking" and "scary."

"It continues to haunt us. The virus continues to mutate," James said. "It's rising at a rate that's near vertical."

The surge in omicron cases should be a "wake-up call" for the unvaccinated, doctors said, because they stand to face greater health risks.

On Thursday, Prisma hospitals across the state had 628 COVID-19 inpatients, a 51% increase in one week and an all-time high for the healthcare system with 18 hospitals serving 21 counties from the Upstate to the Midlands.

Of those hospitalized, 78% were unvaccinated, and 88% of the people on ventilators were unvaccinated.

At a news conference Thursday — again — doctors urged residents to get vaccinated and boosted.

"This vaccine is safe; it is effective," said Dr. Anna-Kathryn Burch, a Prisma pediatric infectious disease doctor. "If we didn't believe this as physicians, we wouldn't get ourselves vaccinated and our children vaccinated."

Dr. Divya Ahuja, a Prisma infectious disease doctor, said 53% of South Carolinians are vaccinated.

"That's just wrong if you want this epidemic to end," Ahuja said. "It has to go up."

The omicron surge is creating a greater strain on Prisma's hospitals, primary care physicians, emergency rooms and pediatricians.

The healthcare system refused to say how many of its own staff members were out sick with COVID-19.

Ahuja said he expects to see the surge go down in six to eight weeks if South Carolinians continue to take precautions.

"We're seeing a strain put on us and every organization in the Upstate," James said. "Just get vaccinated. That's the best weapon in the toolbox."

SC has shortage of COVID drugs

If you are hospitalized with COVID-19 and have low oxygen levels, in the first few days you will most likely be treated with antiviral drugs, according to Ahuja. If the sickness remains, doctors are no longer treating the virus but the remaining inflammation, he said.

If you are high-risk — an unvaccinated child, a senior or have an underlying illness — you will most likely receive outpatient treatment with antibodies, Ahuja said.

There is only one monoclonal antibody treatment that works against omicron, Sotrovimab, Ahuja said, and it's in short supply. Prisma doctors are giving it only to patients with a higher risk of progression.

COVID-19 drug Paxlovid, developed by Pfizer, is in short supply in South Carolina as well. When it was first shipped to South Carolina, only 800 doses were received, Ahuja said.

"A 22-year-old boy or girl does not need that drug. They will get better," Ahuja said. "They should be reserved for the highest-risk patients who are going to have a worse outcome."

Ahuja also warned people not to take ivermectin, a controversial drug developed to treat parasites in livestock.

More on ivermectin:Man whose wife won a lawsuit to treat his COVID-19 with ivermectin has died

"Unless you are a horse, I don't think you need to take ivermectin," Ahuja said.

Ahuja also recommended that unvaccinated people who have had COVID-19 still get the vaccine 14 to 30 days after they are infected to further boost the immune system.

All children hospitalized with COVID in SC are unvaccinated

South Carolina currently has 43 children hospitalized with COVID-19 at its four children's hospitals, and 16 of them are in the Upstate. Of those children hospitalized in the state, nine of those children are in critical condition and three are on ventilators.

All hospitalized children in South Carolina are unvaccinated, officials said, and 18 of the 43 were ineligible for the vaccine because they're under age 5.

"That should be a driving message to the community," Burch said. "How do you prevent your child from being hospitalized with COVID? The best way to do that is to get your child vaccinated if they're eligible."

Children who are obese are also more susceptible to the virus, according to Burch.

Symptoms that are appearing in children are fever, nasal congestion, cough, wheezing and low oxygen levels.

Even doctors are confused by CDC guidance. Here's what you should do

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been updating its guidance for quarantine and isolation as omicron surges — and even doctors are confused about it.

"We need to follow CDC guidelines that are available on their website. Are they confusing? Yes. Do they change? Yes. But this is an evolving science, and they are trying to do the best that they can with the available information," Ahuja said.

? In any situation that you are exposed to COVID-19, if you develop symptoms at any time, you should get tested and isolate at least until you know the results.

? Otherwise, if you have had contact with someone infected with COVID-19 and are fully vaccinated and boosted, you do not have to quarantine. You must wear a mask around others for 10 days and should get tested on the fifth day after exposure.

? If you have had contact with someone infected with COVID-19 and are not fully vaccinated, you must quarantine for five days. After those five days are up, get tested and continue to wear a mask around others for five more days.

? If you're a healthcare worker and you've been exposed to COVID-19, you do not have to quarantine if quarantine is not feasible with maintaining patient care, according to Prisma. You must test negative on day five after exposure and wear a mask for 10 days.

? If you live with someone who has COVID-19, begin quarantine when the infected person has finished their five-day quarantine and has no symptoms. After quarantining for five days, get tested and wear a mask around others for an additional five days.

Prisma doctors also said they've seen "a lot" of people going to the emergency room for a COVID-19 test, but that's not what emergency rooms are for, and that could potentially affect care for those in urgent need. To find a free testing site near you, visit SCDHEC.gov/covid19testing.

Genna Contino covers Greenville County and housing for The Greenville News. Contact Genna at gcontino@gannett.com or on Twitter @GennaContino. Subscribe to The Greenville News at greenvillenews.com/subscribe.

Everything you need to know about the snow forecast for Greenville, South Carolina

This story is free to all as a public service of The Greenville News. You can support the Upstate reporters and photographers who are providing this weather coverage and other outstanding local journalism by becoming a subscriber.Winter weather is forecasted for this weekend, and you can depend on The Greenville News for the latest information.Check back throughout the weekend for...

This story is free to all as a public service of The Greenville News. You can support the Upstate reporters and photographers who are providing this weather coverage and other outstanding local journalism by becoming a subscriber.

Winter weather is forecasted for this weekend, and you can depend on The Greenville News for the latest information.

Check back throughout the weekend for updates on impacts from the storm: from power outages and school closings to road conditions.

Here are links to our top storm coverage.

Latest weather forecast

Winter Storm Watch:Up to 12 inches of snow possible in parts of Upstate north of I-85

Greenville County:Confidence increases for possible winter storm in Greenville this weekend including rain, snow, ice

Anderson County:Here's how much snow and ice Anderson could be getting this wintery weekend

Spartanburg County:Weekend winter storm with snow and ice mix is likely in Spartanburg County, according to NWS

Preparation

Driving in snow:Check tire pressure and treads before heading out

Road preparation:Certain roads are being prepared for a winter storm in SC. Here's what will happen where

Check on the elderly, get prescriptions:How to prepare for the winter storm in Greenville

Milk, bread, sleds:Rush is on at grocery and hardware stores ahead of snow forecast in Upstate SC

History of winter storms in South Carolina

The Great Blizzard of 1993:Stories of the massive snow that battered Upstate South Carolina

Upstate winter storm in January 2018:Check out how much snow fell

Snow Closings Across the Upstate and Greenville, SC

Wondering what is closed due to weather in Greenville, Spartanburg and across the Upstate? We’re keeping a running list right here of local businesses that are closed or operating with reduced hours or services. Here’s what’s closed in the Upstate.January 2022 Snow ClosuresThe gate on the F. Van Clayton Highway (the road you take up to the Sassafras Mountain Overlook) will close on Saturday, January 15th at 4 pm. An announcement will be made when the road reopens.Greer Station, ...

Wondering what is closed due to weather in Greenville, Spartanburg and across the Upstate? We’re keeping a running list right here of local businesses that are closed or operating with reduced hours or services. Here’s what’s closed in the Upstate.

January 2022 Snow Closures

The gate on the F. Van Clayton Highway (the road you take up to the Sassafras Mountain Overlook) will close on Saturday, January 15th at 4 pm. An announcement will be made when the road reopens.

Greer Station, Downtown Greer, SC will be closing Trade Street on Saturday for the duration of the storm, allowing photographers to get snow photos in historic Downtown Greer.

Downtown Greenville, SC: Parking on Main Street between Pendleton Street and College Street will not be permitted Saturday, Sunday or Monday to allow crews access to clear the roads. City garages will be open with free parking Sunday through noon on Monday.

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate will be closed Sunday, January 16th, 2022.

Japanese New Year Festival at Swamp Rabbit Cafe – Postponed to a later date (TBA)

Greenville County Museum of Art will be closed on Sunday, January 16th, 2022.

Greenville Zoo closed Sunday, January 16th and 17th, 2022.

Greer Station, Downtown Greer, SC will be closing Trade Street on Saturday for the duration of the storm, allowing photographers to get snow photos in historic Downtown Greer.

Downtown Greenville, SC: Parking on Main Street between Pendleton Street and College Street will not be permitted Saturday, Sunday or Monday to allow crews access to clear the roads. City garages will be open with free parking Sunday through noon on Monday.

City of Greer Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Day of Celebration has been rescheduled for January 24th, 2022

Friends of the Reedy River and The Greenville County Cleanup Day Events are canceled on Monday, January 17th, 2022.(Volunteers are always needed, more information is in the link above)

Greenville Zoo closed Sunday, January 16th and 17th, 2022.

The Upcountry History Museum will be closed Sunday, January 16th, 2022.

Downtown Greenville, SC: Parking on Main Street between Pendleton Street and College Street will not be permitted Saturday, Sunday or Monday to allow crews access to clear the roads. City garages will be open with free parking Sunday through noon on Monday.

Staying home and looking for something to do?

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.